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Brigada Eskwela Plus

To prepare for the coming school year, the Department of Education (DepEd) conducts an annual Brigada Eskwela campaign for at least two weeks.

During the Brigada Eskwela campaign period, volunteers prepare the school for the start of classes in June. Minor maintenance work such as the repainting of the roof and exterior walls, repairing of leaking water pipes, ceiling boards, broken furniture and windows is done by volunteers with the help of donations in kind from corporations and non-government organizations.

Principals and school heads are encouraged to organize the activity in their respective schools. Working with their Parent-Teacher Community Associations (PTCAs) as early as February, they recruit parent volunteers and approach local businesses for donations by March, and organize work groups by April.

Through the years, our public schools have benefited from Brigada Eskwela in terms of Maintenance and Other Operating Expenses (MOOE) amounting to billions of pesos. This year, the DepEd expects more schools to participate and generate more community MOOE.

This year, the DepEd will launch Monday the Brigada Eskwela Plus all over the country. Beyond the material and financial benefits generated from this worthwhile endeavor in the form of better classrooms and campuses, the schools also benefit from the goodwill generated when people exert efforts for the common good – hand in hand with other like-minded members of the community.

Brigada Eskwela has become the current-day version of our proverbial Bayanihan spirit – that tradition of volunteerism we Filipinos value. Brigada Eskwela conveys to the students the essence of community and of humanity, which forms the core of the Filipino spirit.

Filed under: Education, Get Involved, Sorsogon News Updates, Youth Community Service Groups,

New system to slash OFW remittance fees, says BSP

Source: GMANews.TV

Overseas Filipino Workers (OFW) stand to save P100 to P500 when sending money to the Philippines once the new Philippine Payments and Settlements System Remit System starts operating before the fourth quarter of the year.

Also known as the Philpass Remit System, the new settlement system for money transfers would eliminate third party courier services between commercial banks in remittances involving bank credits, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas said Monday.
“This will reduce the cost of remitting money from the OFW remitter to the beneficiary,” the BSP said.

“Under the existing system, beneficiaries pay from P150 to P550 as back-end processing fee. With the migration to the new system, the fee will be reduced to P50 for each remittance transaction as the BSP will be charging banks a minimal amount for the settlement of transactions,” the BSP explained.

With the Philpass Remit System, families of OFWs would be able to save from P92 million to P922 million a year in remittance fees, the central bank said.

The central bank said the Philpass Remit System is a “safer, faster, and cheaper means of remittance transactions,” as it uses the BSP-Philpass clearinghouse in moving remittances from a local bank to another bank where the OFW beneficiary maintains an account.

The system is an initiative of the BSP and the Association of Bank Remittance Officers Inc. (ABROI), under a memorandum of agreement (MOA) signed in December.

The Philpass Remit System was originally scheduled to start in the first quarter, but only one bank was able to migrate to the new system since the MOA was signed. The BSP did not name the bank.

“Only this bank therefore will be able to service the processing of incoming and outgoing remittances at P50 per transaction as back-end processing fee charged to the OFW beneficiary, while the rest of the ABROI member banks might still charge the old rate,” the central bank said.

According to the BSP, other member banks would come on stream once the remaining issues on hardware and system connectivity have been resolved.

Other ABROI members expect to migrate to the new system this month at the end of June, while two banks would be able to comply with the new system at the end of September.
Remittances by OFWs grew by 7 percent to $4.339 billion in the first quarter of the year from $4.057 billion a year earlier.

Last year, the money transferred by OFWs to relatives in the Philippines went up by 5.4 percent to a record $17.348 billion from $16.426 billion

The BSP expects OFW remittances to grow by 8 percent this year.

About 81 percent of total remittances reported by local banks in the first quarter came from the US, Canada, Saudi Arabia, UK, Japan, Singapore, Italy, and the United Arab Emirates. —VS, GMANews.TV

Filed under: Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, ,

Emergency Telephone Numbers

A very interesting email from my friend “Melanie”. Thank you for sharing this phone numbers.

These are more effective than 911

DIRECT LINE:  dial Jeremiah 33:3

WHEN>>
You are sad, phone John 14
You have sinned, phone Psalm 51
You are facing danger, phone Psalm 91
People have failed you, phone Psalm 27
It feels as though God is far from you, phone Psalm 139
Your faith needs stimulation, phone Hebrews 11
You are alone and scared, phone Psalm 23
You are worried, phone Matthew 8:19-34
You are hurt and critical, phone 1 Corinthians 13
You wonder about Christianity, phone 2 Corinthians 5:15-18
You feel like an outcast, phone Romans 8:31-39
You are seeking peace, phone Matthew 11:25-30
It feels as if the world is bigger than God, phone Psalm 90
You need Christ like insurance, phone Romans 8:1-30
You are leaving home for a trip , phone Psalm 121
You are praying for yourself , phone Psalm 87
You require courage for a task, phone Joshua 1
Inflation’s and investments are hogging your thoughts, phone Mark 10:17-31
You are depressive, phone Psalm 27
Your bank account is empty, phone Psalm 37
You lose faith in mankind, phone 1 Corinthians 13
It looks like people are unfriendly, phone John 15
You are losing hope, phone Psalm 126
You feel the world is small compared to you, phone Psalm 19
You want to carry fruit, phone John 15
Paul’s secret for happiness, phone Colossians 3:12-17
With big opportunity/ discovery, phone Isaiah 55
To get along with other people, phone Romans 12


ALTERNATE NUMBERS


For dealing with fear, call Psalm 47
For security, call Psalm 121:3
For assurance, call Mark 8:35
For reassurance, call Psalm 145:18



ALL THESE NUMBERS MAY BE PHONED DIRECTLY.
NO OPERATOR ASSISTANCE IS NECESSARY.
ALL LINES TO HEAVEN ARE AVAILABLE 24 HOURS A DAY.
FEED YOUR FAITH, AND DOUBT WILL STARVE TO DEATH

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration,

GSIS offers scholarship to relatives of members

The Government Service Insurance System (GSIS), in partnership with STI, is offering a 20 percent scholarship grant on tuition and laboratory fees this coming school year.

Now on its second year, the tie-up called GSIS-STI Grants, is open to all qualified relatives of GSIS members and pensioners, who are going to enroll as incoming freshmen in any STI campus nationwide.

The educational assistance is extended up to the 6th civil degree of affinity and/or consanguinity which means that not only the children of GSIS members and pensioners can avail of the partial scholarship grant but also the relatives.

To avail of the partial scholarship grant, GSIS members and qualified relatives need to present to STI the GSIS eCard, subject to verification.

In addition to making quality education more affordable, the tie-up also aims to boost the employment rate in the country. This, as STI is also committed to procure the assistance of Global Resource for Outsourced Workers, Inc. (GROW), which in turn will provide assistance in securing employment for qualified relatives of GSIS who have successfully graduated from their courses in their chosen STI schools.

GROW, a POEA-licensed placement company, is a member of the STI Education Services Group.

It forms part of STI’s Enrollment-to-Employment system (E2E).

STI is a leading provider of Information Communications Technolo (ICT) and ICT-enhanced education.

It has a network of more than 100 campuses nationwide with academic programs in ICT, Business and Management, Hotel and Restaurant Management, Engineering and Healthcare.

GSIS members and qualified beneficiaries can continue to benefit from the 20 percent scholarship grant in the succeeding semesters until they have graduated from their chosen field, provided that they continue to meet the applicable minimum standards and qualifications stated on STI’s scholarship guidelines and student handbook.

“We want nothing more but to provide quality education to our children and job opportunities when they graduate from college. Now, our members, pensioners, and their dependents, are assured of that dream, with the help of STI,” GSIS president and general manager Winston F. Garcia said.The Government Service Insurance System (GSIS), in partnership with STI, is offering a 20 percent scholarship grant on tuition and laboratory fees this coming school year.

Now on its second year, the tie-up called GSIS-STI Grants, is open to all qualified relatives of GSIS members and pensioners, who are going to enroll as incoming freshmen in any STI campus nationwide.

The educational assistance is extended up to the 6th civil degree of affinity and/or consanguinity which means that not only the children of GSIS members and pensioners can avail of the partial scholarship grant but also the relatives.

To avail of the partial scholarship grant, GSIS members and qualified relatives need to present to STI the GSIS eCard, subject to verification.

In addition to making quality education more affordable, the tie-up also aims to boost the employment rate in the country. This, as STI is also committed to procure the assistance of Global Resource for Outsourced Workers, Inc. (GROW), which in turn will provide assistance in securing employment for qualified relatives of GSIS who have successfully graduated from their courses in their chosen STI schools.

GROW, a POEA-licensed placement company, is a member of the STI Education Services Group.

It forms part of STI’s Enrollment-to-Employment system (E2E).

STI is a leading provider of Information Communications Technolo (ICT) and ICT-enhanced education.

It has a network of more than 100 campuses nationwide with academic programs in ICT, Business and Management, Hotel and Restaurant Management, Engineering and Healthcare.

GSIS members and qualified beneficiaries can continue to benefit from the 20 percent scholarship grant in the succeeding semesters until they have graduated from their chosen field, provided that they continue to meet the applicable minimum standards and qualifications stated on STI’s scholarship guidelines and student handbook.

“We want nothing more but to provide quality education to our children and job opportunities when they graduate from college. Now, our members, pensioners, and their dependents, are assured of that dream, with the help of STI,” GSIS president and general manager Winston F. Garcia said.

Source: http://tinyurl.com/2wg8se4

Filed under: Education, Scholarship Program, Sorsogon News Updates, ,

Pagrapado kan dengue, namemeligro – P.H.O.

by: Rex Bolima, DZMS
Nagpatanid na Provincial Health Office (PHO) sa posibleng pagrapado kan helang na dengue sa pag abot kan bulan na Junio. Sinabi ni Provincial Health Officer Dr. Edgar Garcia na namemeligro na naman an pagdestroso kan siring na helang dahilan sa pinaglalaoman na paglaog kan panahon nin tigoran. Dahilan kaini inabisuhan kan opisyal an mga maestra asin school administrator na linigan na an saindang classroom tanganing maiwasan na lagdoan ini kan mga namok. An pahayag kan opisyal ginibo matapos na kompirmaron kan PAGASA DOST Legaspi an paglaog kan La Nina phenomenon sa huring kwarter kan taon.

Filed under: Sorsogon News Updates

DTI warns public on buying LPG

by: Bing Divina/Rex Bolima (DZMS)

The Deparment of Industry (DTI) recently issued an advisory on buying a particular product especially LPGs.  In an interview by DZMS news, Consumer Welfre Divisions Chief Evelyn Paguio said that the consumers should also check the seal of a certain product, like LPG, whether it passed the quality safety standards.  She admits, though, that consumers tend to focus more on the price rather than the product quality.

The statement was made after a house in Isla de Higante, Brgy. Salog could have been on fire after the LPG leaked.

Filed under: Sorsogon News Updates

Demand for goat products draws more farmers into goat farming

By Danny O. Calleja


Farmers here and other parts of Sorsogon province have recognized goat raising as environment friendly and profitable farming venture.

City councilor Roberto Dollison, head of the three-year old Sorsogon Goat Raisers Association (SGRA), on Tuesday said “from backyard raisers, our group is mulling on converting into a cooperative and turn bigtime entrepreneur to take advantage of the demand for goat products like breeders, meat and milk.”

Each of the 25 members of SGRA had an average of 10 heads of goat stocks of various breeds and raising them is already a quite good number to start for bigtime farming, Dollison said.

The country had still a meager number of goats even with the shift in diet preferences and the growing demand and interest for goat meat in the local market. The goat population is presently estimated at 3.3 million and rising continuously, Dollison ,quoting a recent report of the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), said.

One big problem, he said was the cost of breeder goats that as of the present, a six-month old native female at 10-12 kilograms already commands a price of P2,500. A four-month old meztizo weanling costs P4,000 and bucks for breeding are now at P11,000 to P20,000 per head.

But a recent report of the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) said that this problem does not stop raisers and breeders from dipping their hands into this low-risk profitable livelihood.

Goats adapt well to any existing farming system and feed on forages and other farm products although raisers also use concentrates, it said.

“Goats are very popular among Filipinos because they require low initial capital investment, fit the small hold farm conditions, and multiply fast,” PCARRD explained in its investment briefer. “Culturally, goats are integral to every special occasion such as birthdays, baptisms, weddings, and fiestas. Hence, they command a higher price compared with other meats in the market.”

These ruminants require low maintenance because they eat tree leaves, grasses, weeds and agricultural by-products. “Goats require less feed than cows and carabaos as about 10 native goats can be fed on the feedstuffs sufficient for one cattle and about seven purebred dairy goats can be fed on the feedstuffs adequate for one dairy cow.

“Although a goat is small, it can produce as much as four liters of milk a day if it is purebred and is given a ration to meet all of its nutritional requirements,” the PCARRD added.

A PCARRD study conducted found out that goats are multi-purpose ruminants producing 58.4 percent milk, 35.6 percent meat, 4.3 percent hide and 1.7 percent fiber. It said that these small ruminants could provide the answer to improve nutritional requirements of the predominantly rural farm families scattered all over the archipelago.

As goat production requires low initial investment and small risks compared to other livestock, it is therefore an attractive undertaking among resource-poor families. In addition, women and children can raise the animals, making it a sound option to augment the country’s programs on livelihood. Goats provide livelihood to about 15 million Filipinos across the country, according to PCARRD.

Despite this, goat farming is still not very popular among Filipinos and no one exactly knows how many goats are there in the country.

PCARRD claims that the total goat inventory is “steadily increasing” at 2 percent per year. This supply is still not enough to meet the current demands. “We expect that the increased demand will last to 2020 when the project supply can meet the demand of the consumers,” PCARRD said.

The optimum potential of goat as one of the main sources of milk and meat has not been fully tapped in the country.

The Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA) reported that the total number of goats in the country is about 3,355,574. Most of the goat farms are concentrated in Southern Luzon and various parts of Mindanao.

In Mindanao, Dollison said, goat farming was considered a “sunshine industry.” The country’s second largest island has a large Muslim population and goat meat is considered Halal food. There is also a big demand in the international market, particularly the Middle East.

In Sorsogon, Dollison said more and more people were raising goats in their farms that aside from providing them a steady income from the milk and sales of breeding stocks, they have discovered one thing about the animals.

“Their manure is a good source of fertilizer,” he said. SGRA’s combined stock of about 250 goats provides organic fertilizer for our farms planted to rice, rootcrops, vegetables, coconuts and fruit trees that since fertilizer costs have gone up, more and more farmers are turning to goatraising, Dollison said.

There are at least 12 known goat species in the world but only a relatively small number of breeds are economically useable. The Philippine’s native goat is small but hardy. It weighs about 25 kilograms at maturity and produces only about 350 grams of milk with butterfat content of around 4.6 percent daily.

The Dadiangas goat is common in General Santos City is a mixture of native, Nubian and Jamnapari goats and some animals may even have some Alpine or Saanen blood. The milk production and butterfat content are marginally higher than native goats and they do best in the drier areas of the country.

Of the introduced breeds in the country, Anglo Nubian performs the best along with the newer introduced Boer goats. The dairy breeds such as the Saanen, Toggenburg and French Alpine perform relatively poorly.

For those who cannot afford a purebred stock, starting with the best female goats available in the locality is the best idea and bred them with purebreds or upgraded stock and by selecting th desirable offspring and discarding the undesirable ones, a good stock will emerge later, Dollison said.

For commercial or large-scale operation, the production inputs are aplenty. Fixed investment includes land, goat house, fences, pasture area, water pump, feeding trough, spade, wheelbarrow, and ropes.

“You have to buy breeding does and breeding bucks. Operating expenses include veterinary medicines, drugs, and vaccines; feed supplements and goat rations; and repair and maintenance of goat house, fences, equipment, and pasture. Fixed and seasonal labor is also required,” he said.

PCARRD said, with minimal initial capital investment of about P67,000 for 25-doe level, P174,500 for 60-doe level, or P349,000 for 100-doe level, positive net income and return-on-investment (ROI) are realized, even as early as the first year.

The ROI for five years is 67 percent from a 25-doe level operation under semi-confinement scheme and 60 percent from 50- and 100-doe level operations under pure confinement system. Payback period is two years, the PCARRD added.

Goats have gone a long way from being just poor man’s cows. These animals have proven to be more than just four-legged mammals that generate milk and meat. They survive in almost any kind of environment that is dry and where feed resources are available, making their potential as one of the main sources of farm income.

Given all those advantages, PCARRD said it has picked up on this renewed interest on goats and is now laying various science and technology (S&T) initiatives to continue coming up with better quality stocks, promote goat reproduction techniques and encourage new and fresh approaches to manage goats and the business of raising them.

Along with the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFDA), PCARRD has initiated trainings on effective goat management to further promote its competence.

After analyzing the cost and returns of raising goats, they proved that it is a low-risk profitable livelihood. Assuming a goat raiser has five does at P2,500 each, an initial investment of P32,000 can mean extra income of at least P14,800 in sales of goat stock after two business years.

PCARRD has also initiated its 1,000-goat farms program that aims to launch 1,000 smallholder farmers into full-time commercial goat raisers to continue the wave of effect that goat raising has started.

In the end, even with problems on seasonality of demand, fluctuating prices of goats and breeders, high costs of feed, wavering veterinary services and high taxes and business permits to start with, raising goats will continue to flourish and find its optimum potential in the future, it said.

That is because 63 percent of the world’s total meat consumption can be credited to goat meat. According to http://www.boergoatshome.com, people-from Mideasterners and African to Latin American and Arabs prefer goat meat than any other veal-like meat around the world. (PNA Bicol)

Filed under: Sorsogon News Updates

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