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My Dad is a Broke OFW (An open letter to all OFW’s)

Kumusta na kabayan!

First, I would like to thank you for being an OFW. My dad used to be an OFW and I know the many sacrifices you are enduring right now just so that you can provide the best for your family. I admire you, I appreciate you and in my book, you are a true Pinoy hero.

Second, I would like to help you. I would like to help you in the same way I helped Bobet, a former OFW. Under my coaching, from being broke and in debt, in just 12 months Bobet became a millionaire. Bobet is in fact back in the Philippines. He no longer needed to work as a nurse here in the U.S. He no longer misses his wife and kids. He can now kiss and hug them everyday. He has achieved in 1 year what most OFWs will never achieve in their lifetime. How did he do it?

I taught Bobet the Secrets of Wealth. And if you want to be like Bobet, read on because I want to teach you the Secrets of Wealth as well. But there’s a catch. You will only understand the Secrets of Wealth by understanding how my dad, an OFW like you became broke.

I’ve experienced as a child what I call a roller coaster of wealth. In Tagalog, we call this “Gulong ng Palad” (Wheel of Fortune) because there are times we’re on top of the world and there are times we’re at the bottom. When my dad comes back from abroad it is like a fiesta. The alcohol is overflowing. The whole town seems to be at our door step and my dad’s pasalubongs never seem to run out. Packets of cigarette. Bottles of whisky. Chocolates for the kids. Jewelry for my mom. It is like we’re millionaires every time my dad goes home.

But we’re millionaires only for a short time.

Two weeks later, the money’s gone. My mom and dad start to argue. And my dad seriously considers going back to the ship. He borrows money from his mom – my grandmother (we call “Nanay”). One time, my mom and dad even asked me to borrow money from Nanay because both of them were already turned down. I guess that tactic worked because Nanay couldn’t say NO to his apo and we ate dinner that night.

Then things turn for the worse. The many friends who cheerfully greeted my dad’s homecoming are no longer around. Instead, creditors start hounding us, pounding at our door. At 8 years old, I am taught to lie and tell the creditor my mom is not around even though she is just there beside me kneeling and praying the creditor goes away.

From feeling like millionaires for a few days to being dead broke 2 weeks later – describing it as a roller coaster or a wheel of fortune is an understatement. My mom and dad managed to squander all their savings and more.

So 2 months later, my dad is back at the airport again. We have tears in our eyes once again as we bid him goodbye. My dad would have to work hard on a ship 10 months in a year mostly to pay off our greedy lenders and creditors.

My dad tried to invest – buying a tricycle but the business became bankrupt as fast as it was started. My dad recalled that tricycle with pride in his voice “It was the first stainless steel tricycle in our town”. He was proud of the product but he did not take the time to understand the business.

There were many days our home is literally dark because we couldn’t pay for the electric bill. Once, as a 9-year old boy, I was devastated when I saw my books have been sold so that we will have food on the table that day. Then the worst happened: we lost our home to foreclosure because there was no money left to pay for the mortgage.

Is the story above familiar to you? I bet most OFWs have the same lifestyle cycle as my dad. Rich one day then broke another.

Have you discovered the Secrets to Wealth in my dad’s story?

At its core, it really is very simple. You will be wealthy if you do the exact opposite of what my dad did.

Don’t waste your money by throwing a lavish home coming party for the whole town – SAVE your money instead. Have a small gathering with your family and loved ones. Your children will appreciate it more because they want your presence more than your presents. Get into the habit of saving at least 10-20% of everything you earn. The earlier you get that habit the wealthier you will become or the faster you will become a millionaire.

Bobet saves 50% of what he earns. No wonder he has become a millionaire in only 12 months.

But you cannot save your way to millions. You have to learn how to invest your savings. My aunt who used to work as a bank clerk, who earned 1/10th of what my dad earned as a seaman is now a multi-millionaire because she learned to invest her money. Your savings must go to “work” for you. They must produce good returns or profit. But you cannot stop there. You have to reinvest your profits so that your wealth can grow exponentially.

My aunt started a business butchering chickens in the wet market (palengke). She saved half of her profits and lived off the other half. She then put her savings to buy a store. The profits from the store and the chicken business were then invested into a farm. The profits from the farm, the store and the chicken business were then invested into a resort. The profits from the resort, the farm, the store and the chicken business were then invested into apartment buildings.

As a result of saving, investing, and reinvesting her profits, my aunt becomes richer and richer even as she works less and less while my dad because of spending, borrowing, then spending becomes poorer and poorer even as he works harder.

The choice is yours. Bobet chose to become rich and he put in the time to learn and apply the Secrets of Wealth. Bobet is now in the Philippines employing 30 people because of the businesses he started. 30 families now rely on Bobet because he applied the Secrets of Wealth and Bobet is proving you can become wealthy even back home.

I like you to be wealthy my friend. But the choice is up to you.

Dedicated to your success,

Trace

P.S. Please forward this to every OFW you know – in fact, forward it to everyone you know for that matter. Everyone needs to learn and apply the Secrets of Wealth.

Trace Trajano is a real estate investor, author of the best selling book “Think Rich – Quick” and a wealthcoach to students around the world. His vision is to create directly or indirectly 1 Million Pinoy Millionaires worldwide by the year 2020. Trace himself is an OFW living in the Mason Ohio with his wife and 2 kids. For more information go to http://BuyFirstDeal.com

—–

To our financial freedom!

Jay Castillo
Real Estate Investor
Real Estate Broker License #: 20056
Blog: http://www.foreclosurephilippines.com
Social Network: http://foreclosurephilippines.ning.com
Mobile: +639178843882
E-mail: ph.investor [at] gmail [dot] com

Filed under: Business, Business Ideas for OFW Families, Financial Literacy, Kwentong OFW, Motivation, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training, ,

Business for OFW’s Returning to the Philippines

Identifying Small Business
Opportunities in the Philippines

Identify small business opportunities in the Philippines now and get started! Don’t wait until your contract abroad expires or until you retire before you start your own business.

You have the advantage of being gainfully employed as an Overseas Filipino.
Venture into a business using your specialized skill/knowledge, experience and capital that you gained from working and living abroad.

The process of identifying small business opportunities and choosing the number one opportunity should help you proceed.

Use these three simple steps to help you move forward.

Step 1: Create a list of potential small business opportunities in the Philippines and choose your top three options.

Write down ideas as they hit you – do not edit your thought. Make your list as ideas flow. Look for possibilities when reading the newspaper, or watching a talk show on TV, or browsing the Internet.

Take your time building this list, and then make a short list of three business opportunities. Choose the top three that you love the most. Get the three ideas that you are passionate about and that you think would appeal to customers.

Do not limit your choices to offline business ideas. The Web has provided a very good chance to set up a business and succeed online, so include online business ideas as well. Click here to find how you can take advantage of the way people use the internet for an online business.

Step 2: Assess and choose your number one from the list.
There is no magic formula in choosing the best small business opportunity that will succeed. Some guidelines can help, but use your own judgment in making a final decision.

  • Consider “profitability”. Demand and supply affects profitability. Demand is the desire of people to possess or make use of your product or service while supply is the amount of competition you face for your chosen business idea.
  • Reflect on your knowledge and passion. A business that you know best or are willing to learn and excites you the most would stand out. Malcolm Forbes once said, “The biggest mistake people make in life is not trying to make a living at doing what they most enjoy.”
  • Look for a business idea that has a “fair” return on investment. Decide what is “fair” to you. It is ok to have a business and not make money if you do it as a hobby. But why not earn from your hobby as well?
Step 3: Consider franchising.

Your number one choice may be among the small business opportunities in the Philippines under franchising.

Franchising is a good option. You will enjoy the popularity and support of the franchiser and other franchise holders. The franchiser will guide you in running the business as you start out.

Check several franchisers of the same product or service. Visit their offices and attend product or service presentations to help you decide which is the best franchise for your business. Some may have special offers for Overseas Filipinos.

Finding the right franchiser to work with is just a part of running a successful business. What matters is your passion and interest to what you will be doing. Go back to Step 1 as needed to find the right business for you.

Go through these steps in identifying small business opportunities in the Philippines. The right business opportunity may be just under your nose…

Some Ideas for Small Business Opportunities in the Philippines

Learning how to invest in real estate with these 4 techniques can provide Overseas Filipino Workers extra income. Borrow private money and tell lenders that this is one of the safest ways to invest money.

Setting up an Internet cafe business offers huge potential for Overseas Filipinos. Start making your internet cafe business plan now before coming home for good to the Philippines.

Internet cafe business has a huge potential in the Philippines. This internet cafe business plan and franchise sets up the business right for OFWs and Overseas Filipinos.




Filed under: Business Ideas for OFW Families, Invest in Sorsogon, Kwentong OFW, Livelihood, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training,

OFWs to Aquino: Create more local jobs

By Edith Regalado/Philstar

HONG KONG – If there is one thing that overseas Filipino workers here ask of president-apparent Sen. Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III, it is for his administration to create more jobs and opportunities in the country so they would not have to leave and seek greener pastures abroad.

“Our hope is for the new government to create more jobs in the country so that there would be no more Filipinos would have to go out and work abroad,” said Milagros Ladra, a 44-year old native of Davao City who started working as a domestic helper since 1992.

Ladra has been working here since starting out in Singapore for her first two years as an OFW.

“We all love to go home,” she said.

She said it could be a long shot but that she also shares the same fervent wish that if there are jobs back home, the pay should also be equal if not higher than what they are receiving as OFWs.

Ladra likewise said OFWs here also pin their hope on Aquino that his administration would address the woes of their sector particularly on the matter of the unscrupulous practices of the recruitment agencies.

Delfa Tacuban, another Filipina worker here, said the recruitment fees have been so exorbitant to the extent that OFWs sell all their properties and even borrow money with high interests and yet they end up receiving meager salaries.

“What is worst is when the OFWs arrive here in Hong Kong and they happen to be immediately fired by their employers and their contracts terminated within five days. And now, what would happen to the replacement fee paid?” Tacuban said.

Ladra said the new government should also help in ensuring that there would be a better working condition for the OFWs as a number of them have been subjected to maltreatment, harassment and abuse.

“We hope the new government would help to make sure that all the provisions in the OFW contract shall be followed and complied with by the employers in providing a conducive environment for the OFWs to work,” Ladra said.

Filed under: Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training, Overseas Jobs,

Cash lesson for Pinoys cited in crisis-hit Japan

By Jeremaiah M. Opiniano, OFW Journalism Consortium

PASIG CITY – A real-time crash course in cash management still grips Filipinos in Japan as the world’s second-largest economy attempts to clamber out of recession.

“They [Filipinos] have to start saving or investing rather than just spending” in these times of crisis, sociologist Ma. Rosario Piquero-Ballescas of Toyo University in Bunkyo-ku district said.

Piquero-Ballescas’s advice is based on her observation that the drop in Japan’s gross domestic product last year to -5% hit hard Filipinos there and some lessons should be culled for future similar occurrence.

Some Filipinos in Japan landed on lower-paying jobs after getting laid off in some companies, she said sans citing exact figures.

It has led many of them to rethink their lifestyles in Japan, Piquero-Ballescas added.

The crises made many Filipinos in Japan reflect that “the yen does not last forever,” Ballescas told the OFW Journalism Consortium via email, on a day that Y100 in the Philippine dealing system is worth P48.61, higher than the P45.05-US$1 exchange rate.

The yen continued to weaken against the peso, from an average P50.99-Y100 last year to P48.61 a day after the May 10 national elections.

The yen-peso exchange rate “was tremendously more favorable for many months” last year, so “a lot of Filipinos in Japan took advantage of this,” Ballescas said, explaining the increase in remittance.

Last year, Filipinos in Japan sent home US$773.561 million in remittances or 34.49% more than the US$575.181 million in 2008.

“They may find themselves without jobs or income soon, so they are now doing their best to save whatever they can and send money home as investments, in the event of [an] early return to the Philippines,” Ballescas said in her reply to questions sent by email.

But while the crisis may have prompted an increase in remittance, it was one of the factors that dampened the flow of foreign workers, according to Junichi Akashi of the University of Tsukuba.

Akashi told fellow academics at a policy forum recently that the global economic crisis has affected migrant workers in Japan “unevenly”.

Citing data from Japan’s Immigration Control Bureau, Akashi said there was a noticeable drop in the number of foreigners who entered the country under 2 types of working visas —foreign trainees and technical interns.

The same downward trend was seen for Filipinos who entered in 2009 as foreign trainees and technical interns.

A total of 50,064 foreign trainees entered Japan in 2009, a drop from the 68,150 who entered a year ago. Filipinos as foreign trainees numbered to 2,661 in 2009, lower than the 3,213 in 2008.

Meanwhile, from April 2009 to February this year, 52,133 foreigners shifted to Japan’s technical internship program, lower than the 63,747 the program accepted in 2008.

Filipinos make up 4,004 of the technical interns, but the number is lower than the 5,134 Filipinos who were registered as technical interns in 2008.

The Commission on Filipinos Overseas (CFO) also registered a lower number of Filipinos who went to Japan as permanent residents or emigrants in 2009, with 5,278.

The number was lower than the 7,682 registered emigrants to Japan in 2008 and the 8,806 registered in 2007.

Meanwhile, the number of Filipinos who married spouses from Japan also dropped in 2009 with 4,142 in 2008 versus the 6,114 in 2007.

The decline was noticeable since the Japan-Philippines Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA) took effect last year.

The JPEPA opened Japan to nurses and caregivers from the Philippines, with the first batch included in the total 6,418 deployed last year.

On May 9, the Philippines sent its second batch of 116 nurses and caregivers under the agreement.

Akashi observes that the crisis that hit Japan led to a decreasing number of foreign trainees, especially those in the construction and machinery/metallurgical industries.

Male foreign trainees were affected “to a greater degree,” Akashi said.

Another factor that contributed to the decline of deployment of Filipinos to Japan is the set of immigration rules promulgated in 2005.

From 42,633 that year, the number of OFWs going to Japan dropped to 8,867 in 2007 and 6,555 a year later.

Piquero-Ballescas can only recommend that compatriots take stock of their future in the land of the rising sun. OFW Journalism Consortium

Source: http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/global-filipino/05/22/10/cash-lesson-pinoys-cited-crisis-hit-japan

Filed under: Business Ideas for OFW Families, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training,

Little-known DOST program turns students to techno biz

BY: PAUL ICAMINA

Pili coated in three heavenly flavors: milk-, dark- and bitter sweet chocolates.

It is right there with the best almond chocolates of Hershey’s or Cadbury – and it is made in Bicol, by some members of Class 2005 of the Ateneo de Naga University.

If the entrepreneurs can only extend the six-month shelf life of the chocolates, now with its own barcode, the sweets can easily go beyond Bicol.

It all started in 2005 with a small P274,104 financial assistance from the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) to 11 undergraduates in a program to encourage college students into technology-based enterprises.

Having paid the amount of the original loan, and now graduates, the entrepreneurs applied and was granted in 2007 P231,154 to push the chocolate-coated pili nuts all the way.

The pili enterprise is one of only three projects that have made it to Stage 2, or full commercialization, of the DOST-Academe-Technology-Based Enterprise Development (DAT-BED) Program.

The other two started at the Marcos Agro-Industrial School (MAIS) with a P104,398 financial assistance in 2003 for the food processing, poultry, goat and cattle raising projects of eight students. After three years, the projects earned profits of P42,878; the original amount provided was given to the school as a no-strings-attached grant.

Two of the students, now graduates, pursued their business dreams and each received loans of P336,885 in 2007. Each will fatten 15 heads of cattle using the Urea, Molasses and Mineral Block technology as feed supplement.

The feed is the innovation part of the project required by the DAT-BED Program. The Naga enterprise was innovative in coating pili with chocolates.

“All project proposals are required to be technology-innovative,” said Theda Mae L. Salvania, a young agricultural engineer graduate from the University of the Philippines Los Banos who is part of the DAT-BED monitoring team at the DOST- Technology Application and Promotion Institute (TAPI).

DOST’s Small Enterprise Technology Upgrading Program provides the funding to TAPI which implements DAT-BED.

The 55 on-going Stage 1 projects (for undergraduates) in 18 schools are all agri-based or in food processing maybe because, Salvania explained, the schools are all in rural areas.

Remarkably, except for Ateneo de Naga, all 42 schools accredited since the program started in 1994 are state colleges and universities. Two Metro Manila schools joined this year.

For 2010, three new projects worth P411,820 started at the Palompon Institute of Technology in Palompon, Leyte. Fourteen project proposals from the Central Mindanao State University and nine from Cagayan State University are under review.

Still, the P500,000 used in 2009 reflects the program is not fully tapped by schools.

Out-of-school youths can avail of DAT-BED through non-government organizations linked with college vocational and technical schools with a maximum student-faculty ratio of 25:1 in science and technology courses and entrepreneurship programs.

After three years of successful implementation, TAPI gives the full financial assistance to the school as a grant. If projects are unsuccessful, TAPI gets back the unexpended balance; if it has been exhausted, it requires a full financial report.

To be accredited, schools needs only a DAT-BED orientation and must submit project implementation plans. They must also have a core team of advisers with project-related expertise such as management, business administration, agriculture, home economics and so on.

The TAPI financial assistance are interest-free; it is up to the schools whether to charge 6 percent per annum maximum or agree to income sharing (85 percent to students, 10 percent to advisers and 5 percent to the school).

“DAT-BED aims to develop entrepreneurial competence among students, young professionals and out-of-school youths by providing them access to funds, facilities and technologies,” Salvania said, “at the same time creating income-generating projects for the institutions.”

At the end of the day, she added, “success is indicated by the students turned full-time entrepreneurs and the income and employment they have generated.”

Filed under: Business Ideas for OFW Families, Encouragement, Negosyo Tips, OFW Livelihood Training, Sorsogon News Updates,

GONEGOSYO: FILIPINOS NOT DESTINED TO BE POOR NOR RP BE ‘SICK MAN OF ASIA’

GONEGOSYO: FILIPINOS NOT DESTINED TO BE POOR NOR RP BE ‘SICK MAN OF ASIA’

MANILA, APRIL 22, 2010 (STAR) ASK GONEGOSYO By Joey Concepcion- A winner’s attitude. As we approach May 10, all eyes are set on who will be the next president of our country. A number of Filipinos still believe that each Filipino’s destiny fully relies on the next president.

If the new leadership can continue or better the macro environment, there will be a conducive setting for business in the Philippines. But, the rest is up to us to create our own destiny. Let us stop blaming government for all our misery, unless we fall back to a dictatorship. For as long as we are in a democratic rule where free enterprise is respected, everybody has a good chance to succeed. Many who are below the poverty line will blame the government or other groups for where they are today. This is what Go Negosyo wants to change.

Let me share with you my introduction in our latest book entitled “GO NEGOSYO 100 Inspiring Stories of Small Entrepreneurs: Tagumpay Mula sa Kahirapan”:

Tagumpay is not bound by poverty. Dreams of success are not only for the rich, educated or privileged.

We have been to different cities, provinces and regions all over the Philippines through our Go Negosyo caravans. In all the places that we have been to, we have encountered countless inspiring stories of success. These are the stories of micro, small and medium entrepreneurs (MSMEs). These are the stories of people who have started a negosyo from literally almost nothing.

It is amazing how things turn out in our caravans and other activities. One of our goals is to inspire the local community. But, as we leave, we find out that we are the ones being inspired. Nothing compares to the drive and determination of a person who badly wants to beat poverty. A pile of trash, a handful of peanuts, a piece of tattered cloth or an alkansya filled with five-peso coins can turn into a thriving business venture. We are honored to have met and have known people who changed their destinies through sheer hard work and solid determination.

As we meet these inspiring negosyantes, we are likewise encouraged to be a part of their continuing growth phase as we extend to them our network of entrepreneurs and mentors, our training, seminars and learning fora, which can all help them take their businesses to the next level.

Featured in this book are inspiring stories of 100 small entrepreneurs. They are Go Negosyo’s Most Inspiring Awardees in our caravans; Citi’s Micro Entrepreneur of the Year awardees and finalists; National Livelihood Development Corp.’s SIPAG awardees and finalists; Department of Agriculture’ s featured agri-entrepreneurs in their The Art of Agribusiness book; and entrepreneurs under DTI’s One Town One Product program.

In our activities and programs all over the country, together with our partners and sponsors, one of our goals is to share inspiring stories of struggle and success of the entrepreneurs who have beaten poverty.

This book is our way of celebrating the success of the many MSMEs that serve as one of the backbones of the Philippine economy. Their stories are the journeys to be shared. A lot of Filipinos are suffering a low point of depression because of poverty. It is easy just to give up, let things be, and do nothing. They chose not to. We hope that the stories of these entrepreneurs will ignite their hearts and minds, for them to be able to start new lives.

We need to let people know that it is possible. No matter how buried you are under poverty, there is no reason why you cannot make it. These are stories of people who have faced the’ worst, who reached a turning point in their life, beaten the odds and who have risen above the challenges of life. These are the stories that have changed and will change lives for the better.

Filipinos are neither destined to be poor, nor is the Philippines destined to be the sick man of Asia.

Go Negosyo’s fifth book also stands proof that not all people in the government are corrupt. Many of them work hard to help. Some just lack the guidance and inspiration.

I would like to thank PGMA for giving me the opportunity to serve our Filipino people during the last four years as an advisor on Entrepreneurship Development. I would also like to thank the people who have worked with us in Go Negosyo: from the late Sec. Cerge Remonde who was initially tasked to head the MSME task force and was passionate in helping the sector; to the different government agencies and heads led by Department of Trade and Industry Sec. Peter Favila and Usec. Merle Cruz, who have consistently supported the micro and small entrepreneurs; together with National Livelihood Development Corporation President Lina Amata, Landbank of the Philippines President Gilda Pico, Department of Agriculture Sec. Arthur Yap, Department of Tourism Sec. Ace Durano, Department of Science and Technology Sec. Estrella Alabastro, Department of Education Sec. Jesli Lapus, Commission on Higher Education Chairman Emmanuel Angeles, and the many hardworking partners in government. The success of Go Negosyo in helping inspire Filipinos for a better life will not be possible without the support and the efforts that we have placed together.

These 100 entrepreneurs are just examples of the many that have been helped. The quest to fighting poverty continues. Let this be just the start of showcasing many entrepreneurs who have beaten poverty. As what most people say, God only helps those who help themselves.

Filed under: Business Ideas for OFW Families, Negosyo Tips, OFW Livelihood Training, Sorsogon News Updates,

Philippines Resumes Registration for EPS Language Test

MANILA ― The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) will resume registering Filipino workers who want to work in South Korea under the Employment Permit System (EPS).

POEA Administrator Jennifer Jardin-Manalili announced that the agency will register applicants for the sixth EPS-Korean Language Test (KLT) from April 6 to 8 in Cebu, Metro Manila, Davao, Pampanga and Baguio.

The language test was originally scheduled to be held in the Philippines by the Human Resource Development Service of Korea (HRD Korea) last January but it was postponed due to implementation issues.

Manalili said the POEA and HRD Korea have ironed out the issues regarding the implementation of the EPS and that the examination dates will be announced on March 29.

HRD Korea is the new agency accredited by the Korean government to conduct the language test.

Passing the language test is required for Filipinos to be included on the roster of jobseekers from which Korean employers can choose from.

POEA said jobs in South Korea’s manufacturing industry are only available for qualified applicants for now.

Filipino workers with active status in the POEA online manpower registry as of March 31 this year are qualified to register for the KLT. The application fee for the test was also reduced to $17 from $30.

“Applicants must be able to meet the minimum qualification requirements before being allowed to take the KLT,” the POEA said in its announcement.

Each applicant has to meet the following requirements: must be younger than 38-years-old, have at least one year of work experience and have valid documents such as a passport.

The HRD Korea has also reduced the passing score on the language test to 80 from 120 points.

Applicants who have scored 80 points out of the 50 items on reading and listening, and whose scores are in the top 3,000 will be included on the roster of jobseekers.

Manalili, however, said, “Being on the roster of pre-qualified applicants, however, is not a guarantee for employment as employers will have specific job requirements in hiring their workers.”

POEA said more than 21,000 Filipino workers have worked in South Korea under the EPS since August 2004. The basic monthly salary for a foreign EPS worker in South Korea is about $904, the agency said.

By Jonathan M. Hicap
Korea Times Correspondent

jhicap@yahoo.com

Filed under: Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training, Overseas Jobs, POEA-Advisory,

Groundwork for OFWs computer and financial literacy kicks off

Did you know that among Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), there are so-called 45-day millionaires?

From what I understand, these are those guys who earn really big money and truly once their US dollar, for example, paychecks are converted to Philippine peso, the bills amount to millions.

Why 45-days?

I have not found the answer to this yet, but if we go by the stories of some folks “throwing parties for two weeks”, plus the additional days of shopping, and gift giving, and what have you, one month and a half month could be it.

Another explanation could be that after 45-days, the OFW has to return overseas and resume earning dollars again.

Had it not been due to their basic computer literacy training, many of them might still be trapped in this 45-day millionaire syndrome.

Alas, there is a way out.

Against this backdrop, graduates of the “Tulay”, the Microsoft Unlimited Potential Program Community Technology Skills Program for Overseas Filipino Workers, have began to organize themselves into either alumni groups or cooperatives with business and livelihood projects for members.

An example is the OWWA Microsoft Tulay Alumni Organization of graduates from the Cordilleras and Baguio. Headed by Ediltrudis Irma Person of Tulay Batch 1, her members engage in livelihood activities such a detergent products, Internet café operations, transient homes management, restaurants and meat processing.

In the process of being formalized is the Tulay OFW Cooperative based in Butuan City and spearheaded by former OFW Elisa Capon-Moran. A start up venture being contemplated is smoked fish production.

“OFWs who are trained with basic IT skills have the advantage to explore other business opportunities. With their new found skills, the window of possibilities is endless,” said Susan Ople, president, Blas F. Ople Policy Center and Training Institute.

This month, the BOPC received from Microsoft Philippines more than $200,000 in cash and software grants for the expansion of the “Tulay” for OFWs program.

In the Philippines, “Tulay” was launched by Microsoft in 2004 in partnership with the Department of Labor and Employment, specifically its attached agency Overseas Workers Welfare Administration. Its objective is to provide technology tools and skills training to OFWs and their families.

In 2008, Microsoft started working with the Ople Center, a private non-profit organization that has partnered with OWWA, to put up more learning centers.

“Over the years, “Tulay” has been successful in boosting opportunities for Filipino migrant workers and their beneficiaries. We are happy with the development of “Tulay”. Through the expansion of new training centers, more and more OFWs and their families can take advantage of these opportunities,” said Carmelita Dimzon, Administrator, OWWA, in a press release.

In her progress report and new directions announcement, Ople underscored, “Once empowered…now that they are computer literate, their horizon suddenly expands.”

Thus the challenge of bringing them up to the next level from computer literacy to financial literacy. Combining computer literacy with financial literacy, as she put it.

“We are looking also into possible tie-ups with local government units to pilot test a more OFW-friendly business environment,” she said. “We would like to increase the number of OFWs and their dependents who are able to obtain new sources of income, better jobs, and or put up small businesses after graduating from the Tulay program.”

She underscored, “Given options and when pointed to the right direction, a “Tulay” graduate is empowered enough to consider pursuing other computer courses or opening a small business.”

Since 2004, over 20,000 people have been trained under the “Tulay” program. With the expansion of the program and opening of new centers, “Tulay” is expecting 258,000 individuals to benefit from the program in the next three years.

By EDISON ONG

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/245500/groundwork-ofws-computer-and-financial-literacy-kicks

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Financial Literacy, Kwentong OFW, Livelihood, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training,

RP Embassy Conducts Livelihood Training on Pizza Making for OFWs in Brunei Darussalam

RP Embassy Conducts Livelihood Training on Pizza Making for OFWs in Brunei Darussalam

Posted: 25 Nov 2009 12:38 AM PST

25 November 2009 – The Philippine Embassy in Brunei Darussalam, through the Philippine Overseas Labor Office (POLO), conducted a free training session on pizza -making for Filipino expatriates in Brunei last November 22. The event was sponsored by the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA).

The training programme aimed at equipping the participants with new knowledge, skills and techniques in pizza-making; teaching them alternative means in cooking pizza; and enhancing employability options for livelihood/income generating project in preparation for their reintegration in the Philippines.

Ms. Rhodora Sta. Maria Quiambao acted as the resource speaker during the training. A total of 25 participants attended the program. Some even brought along their children, who actively participated in the hands-on preparation of pizza-making, Welfare Officer Zenaida S. Ramos reported.

Filed under: Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training, Overseas Jobs,

Embassy Conducts Hands-On Massage Therapy Training for OFWs in Brunei Darussalam

Embassy Conducts Hands-On Massage Therapy Training for OFWs in Brunei DarussalamPosted: 19 Nov 2009 10:40 PM PST

20 November 2009 – The Philippine Embassy in Brunei Darussalam, through the Philippine Overseas Labor Office (POLO), conducted a free training session for Filipino expatriates in Brunei last November 15.

The activity was sponsored by the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA).

The training program aimed at equipping the participants with new knowledge, skills and techniques on body massage; teaching them the benefits of body massage; and enhancing employability options for livelihood/ income generating project in preparation for their reintegration in the Philippines.

Ms. Visallie de Jesus-Dayto, Company Director of Health Express Day Spa and Managing Director of Norain Salon at Kiulap, Brunei, acted as the resource speaker during the training. She was assisted by 12 massage therapists. Co-owner Mr. Eddy Maitimo, a Dutch national, also supported the activity for the benefit of OFWs.

In his closing remarks, Philippine Ambassador to Brunei Alexander B. Yano congratulated the 89 participants and advised them to avail themselves of the different programs offered by the Embassy, especially the training programs that offer them new knowledge and skills. He pointed out that this program was in support of the reintegration of our government to provide the OFWs other self-employment opportunities and to maximize their potentials to become entrepreneurs when they return to the Philippines.

The participants requested follow-up hands-on sessions in order for them to acquire more skills and techniques. They welcomed this training as a practical program, for which the massage techniques can also benefit their own family members. END

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Filed under: Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, OFW Livelihood Training, , , , ,

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