SORSOGON UNITED

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Letting Go

By Yay Padua-Olmedo

Nick Vujicic blew into town recently, drawing SRO crowds where he spoke, with audiences chewing his every word as he testified of God’s amazing grace. Without fail, this handsome and charismatic speaker  just let rivers of tears and conviction flow simultaneously from people who suddenly realized that if this guy without arms and legs can do it, so could they, because they have a God who enables—exceedingly—no matter how insignificant, down and out, or trash-worthy they think their lives have been.

nick-vucijic---downsampledI won’t add anymore to the reams or bytes of e-texts written about Nick.  Most of them have been deeply inspirational and life changing.

I’ve attempted this little message though for every mother currently struggling with feelings of condemnation, inadequacy or guilt that they have brought into this world a baby just like Nick.

Mothers who have come to Jesus have never been disappointed. Ever!

No one could know for sure how a mother’s heart dies when she is told that the baby she just gave birth to has been diagnosed as either missing or having some extra body parts, with a hole in his heart or a dextrocardia (heart turned to the right), blood abnormality, or has Down’s syndrome or any kind of disability.

What sin have I committed that my baby came out this way?

I can’t—I don’t know how to—deal with this.

Is there ever a way out of this? Will my baby ever be a normal child?

How can we cope with this? Financially? As a family?

Guilt. Blaming yourself or looking for someone to blame, even blaming God. Helplessness.  Anger. All these come on you like a heavy ceaseless downpour, blurring everything; and sending you a downward spiral toward depression, even thoughts of, “It’s probably better to just end it all.

And it may take years to extricate oneself out of it.

And what about mothers who have decided to abort or have given their unwanted babies for adoption because they were simply not ready for the responsibility—then find themselves eternally hounded by their seemingly unpardonable sin?

One such mother’s life-altering ordeal eventually led her to Jesus Christ. In the same way that Jesus became the answer to Nick’s helpless situation, this mother found her answer only in Christ. As she started to trust Jesus, she found hope in His promise to heal, to provide and to do exceedingly great on behalf of her baby.

What has happened has happened. We live in a fallen world where all sorts of tragedies occur. There are so many things we can’t explain; and we won’t know the answers until we see God face to face.

But Jesus is the only answer. Let the past just be a memory, something we learn from. As you humble yourself now before God, let Jesus wash away all the guilt and condemnation.

“Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus, the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.” (Romans  8:1-2)

As you walk free from the past, believe too that Jesus will turn everything in your child’s favor. “And we know that for those who love God, all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

Mothers who have come to Jesus have never been disappointed. Ever!

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Filed under: Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Touching Heart, Touching Lives, We will make you SHINE!, ,

A FATHER’S MESSAGE FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

4 days ago by

Ever wondered what it is like to have Death staring straight in your eyes? Is there anything you will like to do or change before you draw your last breath? What if you have a family with young children and perhaps some precious time left? What would you do?

Here’s a sad but true story to be shared, about a loving dad and husband, who did what he could in the little time he was left for his family. From their country cottage filled with memories of Mandy Flanagan’s late husband Paul, she shared with us their story.

Paul, a teacher, who died of cancer at the age of 45 in November 2009, passionately believed his children, Thomas and Lucy, should have more than just fading photographs to remember him by. For the children were only five and one-and-half years old at the time of his passing. “There was nothing more important to Paul than being the best father he could be,” says Mandy.

 

“When he knew he was dying, there was no time for self-pity. He became absolutely focused on doing whatever he could to continue being a good dad to them throughout the years, even though he wouldn’t be here in person.”

Amongst his preparation included letters, filmed messages, future birthday presents and his personal chest of favorite books. “Each book is accompanied by a note to Thomas and Lucy explaining why Paul loved it, and how much he hopes they will too when they’re old enough to read it,” explains Mandy.

But perhaps all these gifts pales in comparison to a document titled “On finding fulfillment”, accidentally discovered on his laptop by Mandy. “I opened it and, with tears rolling down my cheeks, I discovered his bullet-pointed code to living a good and happy life,” says Mandy. And this list of 28 instructions was the very way Paul lived his life.

Addressing his children who were too young to understand the tragedy that was unfolding, Paul writes, ”In these last few weeks, following my terminal diagnosis, I have searched my soul and heart to find ways in which I can reach out to you as you grow up.

“I’ve been thinking about the matters in life that are important, and the values and aspirations that make people happy and successful. In my view, and you may well have your own ideas by now, the formula is pretty simple.

“The three most important virtues are: Loyalty, integrity and moral courage. If you aspire, friends will respect you, employers will retain you, and your father will be immensely proud of you. I am therefore giving you several pieces of advice. These are the principles on which I have tried to build my life and they are exactly those that I would have encouraged you to embrace, had I been able to.” “I love you very much. Never forget that.”

“He also wrote that they should never give up, and he certainly never did. He fought so bravely, so courageously, right to the end.”

 

Having been first diagnosed with skin cancer in 2004, where a birthmark on his chest had become malignant. The cancer was removed in November that year when their son Thomas was only a few months old. And after years of regular follow-ups, he was given the all clear in January 2008 when Mandy was expecting Lucy.

However a swelling that appears in May 2008 proved the cancer had spread to his lymph glands in his arms and neck shortly after. Even surgery and radiotherapy was not able to halt its progression. By March 2009, the cancer had spread to his brain and his condition was terminal.

“He never pitied himself,” says Mandy. “The diagnosis, and perhaps the drugs he was on, triggered a sort of mania. He suddenly had so much energy. While I lay awake upstairs worrying, Paul would work through the nights, determined to get his affairs in order.”

Having meticulously organized the family finances, arranged his own funeral, buying presents for their children, their dining room was soon filled piles of shoeboxes filled with paperwork, hand-written letters and DVD messages for his family and friends.

With Lucy christened last summer, she now has one godmother and nine godfathers. “He wanted his friends to have a permanent tie to his family, I think,” says Mandy. “And if Lucy couldn’t have her father, a fantastic team of godfathers was the very least she deserved.”

With his passing at home, some eight months after his terminal diagnosis, Mandy was certain he’ll be able to rest peacefully knowing that he had left the best legacy any father could. “When some people are told they have just a few months to live, they decide their life won’t be complete until they’ve bungee-jumped off Sydney Harbor Bridge or seen the Grand Canyon. But that wasn’t Paul. All that was important to him was right here. He lived and died by his own rules, and I know he had found his fulfillment.”

We all have a finite amount of time in this world, some less than others. And it is not the amount of time, rather how we use it which truly matters. Ever so often we get absorbed by our daily rat race and tend to take our loved ones for granted. Perhaps it is time we slow down and re-examine ourselves before it is too late.

A FATHER’S RULES FOR FINDING FULFILLMENT

Be courteous, be punctual, always say please and thank you, and be sure to hold your knife and fork properly. Others take their cue on how to treat you from your manners.

Be kind, considerate and compassionate when others are in trouble, even if you have problems of your own. Others will admire your selflessness and will help you in due course.

Show moral courage. Do what is right, even if that makes you unpopular. I always thought it important to be able to look at myself in the shaving mirror every morning and not feel guilt or remorse. I depart this world with a pretty clear conscience.

Show humility. Stand your ground but pause to reflect on what the other side are saying, and back off when you know you are wrong. Never worry about losing face. That only happens when you are pig-headed.
Learn from your mistakes. You will make plenty so use them as a learning tool. If you keep making the same mistake or run into a problem, you’re doing something wrong.

Avoid disparaging someone to a third party; it is only you who will look bad. If you have a problem with someone, tell them face to face.

Hold fire! If someone crosses you, don’t react immediately. Once you say something it can never be taken back, and most people deserve a second chance.

Have fun. If this involves taking risks, so be it. If you get caught, hold your hands up.

Give to charity and help those who are less fortunate than yourselves: it’s easy and so rewarding.

Always look on the upside! The glass is half full, never half empty. Every adversity has a silver lining if you seek it out.

Make it your instinct always to say ‘yes’. Look for reasons to do something, not reasons to say no. Your friends will cherish you for that.

Be canny: you will get more of what you want if you can give someone more of what they desire. Compromise can be king.

Always accept a party invitation. You may not want to go, but they want you there. Show them courtesy and respect.

Never ever let a friend down. I would bury bodies for my friends, if they asked me to . . . which is why I have chosen them carefully.

Always tip for good service. It shows respect. But never reward poor service. Poor service is insulting.

Always treat those you meet as your social equal, whether they are above or below your station in life. For those above you, show due deference, but don’t be a sycophant.

Always respect age, as age equals wisdom.

Be prepared to put the interests of your sibling first.

Be proud of who you are and where you come from, but open your mind to other cultures and languages. When you begin to travel (as I hope you will), you’ll learn that your place in the world is both vital and insignificant. Don’t get too big for your breeches.

Be ambitious, but not nakedly so. Be prepared to back your assertions with craftsmanship and hard work.

Live every day to its full: do something that makes you smile or laugh, and avoid procrastination.

Give of your best at school. Some teachers forget that pupils need incentives. So if your teacher doesn’t give you one, devise your own.

Always pay the most you can afford. Never skimp on hotels, clothing, shoes, make-up or jewellery. But always look for a deal. You get what you pay for.

Never give up! My two little soldiers have no dad, but you are brave, big-hearted, fit and strong. You are also loved by an immensely kind and supportive team of family and friends. You make your own good fortune, my children, so battle on.

Never feel sorry for yourself, or at least don’t do it for long. Crying doesn’t make things better.

Look after your body and it will look after you.

Learn a language, or at least try. Never engage a person abroad in conversation without first greeting them in their own language; by all means ask if they speak English!

And finally, cherish your mother, and take very good care of her.

I love you both with all my heart.
Daddy x

 

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Motivation, , ,

Personal flight possible

source: Top Tech Inventions Shaping 2011

Image source: Engadget

Martin Jetpack

Ask just about anybody (that doesn’t have a fear of heights) what superpower they wished they had- and I’ll bet the ability to fly would probably top the list. Personal flight will become possible thanks to the Martin Jetpack (which is not a jet or rocket-powered) and will sell for a hefty sum of $100,000.

The Jetpack, designed by Glenn Martin of New Zealand’s Martin Aircraft Company, uses a premium gasoline engine with 200-horsepower and two ducted fans to provide lift. It can reach a speed of 60 miles per hour, an altitude of 8,000 feet, and fly for about 30 minutes on a full fuel tank.

Unlike earlier devices called “jetpacks”, the Martin Jetpack is the first to be considered a practical device. Initially designed with the leisure market in mind, commercial demand for the Martin Jetpack has seen the research and development program focus on readying the product for use in a number of sectors including emergency response, defense and recreation, with numerous applications in each sector.

Watch this mega hunk of carbon-fiber in action:

Filed under: Information, Innovation, Inspiration, New Ideas, New Invention, , , ,

Simple Self Empowerment Exercise

Here’s an eye opening self empowerment exercise to help you take a quick inventory of your values, priorities and goals. It’s a great little ‘check up’ to see where your priorities are taking you, and if they are helping you travel in the direction of your dreams.

“When you realise that every action you take
is based on your own priorities,
you realise the vast power that is in your own hands.”

YOU are the WIND

Just work through the 6 Steps below. As you’ll see at the end of the exercise, you can go back to number 3 and work through this exercise in any area of your life.

1.  What are 10 of the top values you have been honouring in your life? Your highest values are primary qualities that you most want to have in your life. You base your decisions on these, and they determine your behaviours, how you relate to others, and the actions you take. Identifying these will help you to appreciate your existing self empowerment… it’s you who gets to decide what values you want to live by.

There are hundreds of possible values, from achievement to zeal, and every letter in between. List 10 that speak loudly to you.

2.  Prioritize the 10 highest values you have identified, with #1 being the most important to you.

3. Now take a little inventory of where your life is at in this moment regarding ‘a close personal relationship with a significant other’. Examples of taking a brief stock in this category might be:

  1. I’m in a long term loving relationship and am very happy;
  2. I’m in a long term relationship and not very happy;
  3. I’m single and want a happy relationship;
  4. I’m single and very happily so

4. Then browse over your list of 10 top values and see if you can identify which of your chosen values might be contributing to your ‘present personal relationship status’.

5. Next, state what your optimum ‘personal relationship status’ goal would be in a perfect world.

6. Now, think about how your values might re-organize or change if you want to give relationship priorities greater weight. Would doing so be helpful to achieve your highest vision of a personal relationship in your life? In consideration of this, you might also like to review some literature on what is important in the type of relationship you envision. ex. Love as a Way of Life by Gary Chapman

  • Income and financial
  • Physical and health
  • Mind and learning
  • Social community
  • Spiritual experience

When you do these exercises, you’ll be following the threads that show you the reasons as to why your life looks as it does. You can be thrilled to see these connections, and to know they are in your power to change!
“I’ve gone through life believing in the strength and competence of others; never in my own. Now, dazzled, I discover that my capacities are real.
It’s like finding a fortune in the lining of an old coat.”
Joan Mills

Source: http://www.inspired-personal-development.com/

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Motivation,

Worldclass Sorsoganon Educator

A.A.J.A. AWARD FOR DECHAVEZ. Educator and community leader Willie D.
Dechavez (center) shows the recognition award he received from the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) during a reception held on March 4, 2011 in the GM Renaissance Conference Center in Detroit. With him in photo are State Senator Hoon Yung Hopgood (left) and journalist Ron Jacinto. Dechavez will also receive the Everyday Hero award on March 9, 2011 from Verizon and Urban League of Detroit and Southeastern Michigan.

Filed under: Campus Talk, Community Service Group, Department of Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, Natatanging Sorsoganon, People who inspired Us, Pinoy Migration, Show your pride, Sorsoganon Everywhere, Sorsoganon in the LIMELIGHT!, Sorsogon News Updates, Sorsogon Outstanding Achievers, Touching Heart, Touching Lives, We will make you SHINE!, , , , , ,

A Glass of Milk

Glass with Milk

One day, a poor boy who was selling goods from door to door to pay his way through school, found he had only one thin dime left, and he was hungry. He decided he would ask for a meal at the next house. However, he lost his nerve when a lovely young woman opened the door. Instead of a meal he asked for a drink of water.

She thought he looked hungry so brought him a large glass of milk. He drank it slowly, and then asked, “How much do I owe you?”

“You don’t owe me anything,” she replied. “Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness.”

He said….. “Then I thank you from my heart.” As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was strong also. He had been ready to give up and quit.

Year’s later that young woman became critically ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease. Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the nameof the town she came from, a strange light filled his eyes. Immediately he rose and went down the hall of the hospital to her room.

Dressed in his doctor’s gown he went in to see her. He recognized her at once. He went back to the consultation room determined to do his best to save her life. From that day he gave special attention to the case.

After a long struggle, the battle was won. Dr. Kelly requested the business office to pass the final bill to him for approval.

He looked at it, then wrote something on the edge and the bill was sent to her room. She feared to open it, for she was sure it would take the rest of her life to pay for it all. Finally she looked, and something caught her attention on the side of the bill.

She read these words…..

Paid in full with one glass of milk

(Signed)
Dr. Howard Kelly

Tears of joy flooded her eyes as her happy heart prayed: “Thank You, God, that Your love has spread abroad through human hearts and hands.”

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Sorsogon News Updates,

Longevity Genes Found; Predict Chances of Reaching 100

By Brian Handwerk
for National Geographic News


There’s still no way to predict whether you’ll live to be a hundred—but scientists are getting closer.

A newly discovered suite of 150 “long life” variants in about 70 genes allows scientists to guess, with 77 percent accuracy, whether a person can live into their late 90s or longer, a new study says.

(Get a genetics overview.)

These long-life gene variants, the authors speculate, may suppress genes associated with ailments often linked to aging, such as dementia and heart problems.

“This is just a genetic predisposition,” cautioned study leader Paola Sebastiani, a biostatistician at the Boston University School of Public Health. “It doesn’t mean that you’re going to live to be a hundred. Many things can happen in life.”

Naturally, lifestyle choices, environment, and plain good luck will always play major roles in determining life span—as they may have for the 23 percent of centenarian test subjects found to lack the telltale gene variants.

Maybe this minority “lived long simply because they had some tricks and avoided risk factors,” Sebastiani said. “Perhaps they didn’t smoke, didn’t eat much red meat, or just lived healthier lives.”

Billed as the world’s largest scientific study of centenarians and their families, the New England Centenarians Study has collected data on more than a thousand Caucasian centenarians since 1995. Further studies will extend the research to other ethnicities, beginning in Japan, home to an inordinate number of centenarians.

In industrialized countries only about 1 in every 6,000 people will reach a hundred years of age. Just one in every seven million becomes a “supercentenarian,” reaching 110. Eighty-five percent of all centenarians are women.

(Pictures: “The Secrets of Longevity.”)

From Centenarian Genes to Personal Fountains of Youth?

The new discovery, which the authors call a first step, may lead to people being able to learn in advance how long their bodies are predisposed to last.

Also, further studies of the 150 gene variants could yield advances toward personalized genomics and predictive medicine—particularly in regard to age-related ailments, the study team said.

The research has already revealed one surprise in this respect.

It’s long been known that exceptional longevity runs in families, so many researchers have supposed that the long-lived might be lacking gene variants associated with age-related diseases.

But the new data show that centenarians have just as many of the disease-associated variants as other people. That means the longevity-related variants may somehow cancel or trump the variants associated with such ailments, according to the new study, to be published Friday in the journal Science.

However they do it, the centenarian gene variants generally appear to hold off disability and disease until the last years of lifes. Ninety percent of people who live to be a hundred remain disability free until about age 93, the researchers said.

(Also see “Yeast Life Extended Ten Times; Offers Hope for Humans.”)

Longevity: More Than Just Genetics

Demographer Dan Buettner has spent years studying the world’s longest-lived people and the places where they live, which he’s dubbed blue zones. (Preview Buettner’s article “The Secrets of Long Life.”)

Buettner praised the new research and said it’s long been known that people who reach a hundred not only live well but also have won the “genetic lottery.”

“But genes and environment are inextricably interwoven,” he said.

For example, environmental factors such as food, water, and air quality can shift rapidly, meaning the set of genes that helped today’s centenarians live longer might not have the same benefit to babies born this year, said Buettner, a grantee of the National Geographic Society’s Expeditions Council. (The Society owns National Geographic News.)

(Related: Buettner on the longevity lessons of a small Mediterranean island.)

Buettner believes genetic interventions could someday help slow the aging process—but that remains far in the future, he said. For now each of us must live with the genes we’ve been dealt, which means those hoping to live longer should look at their lifestyles.

“What we know now is that the average American could probably add about ten years of life expectancy and slow the biological clock,” he said.

Eating better, and less, is a big part of the equation, he added. Other aspects are physical activity and mental focus—Buettner believes that people with a strong sense of purpose in their lives can live about seven years longer than those who don’t have one.

“To take advantage of any possible future genetic interventions,” Buettner said, “your best strategy right now is to optimize your lifestyle.”


Read more via: http://preview.tinyurl.com/33bu3vr

Filed under: Health Tips, Healthy Living, Inspiration, New Ideas, Travel and Lifestyle,

TEAM SORSOGON SAPYM OSC RIPPED AWARDS IN THE ARNIS PHILIPPINES NATIONAL TEAM SELECTION

By: SAPYM OSC Kapatiran ng Lakan

Ld. Ray Adrian F. Carranza ripped the gold medal in the heavy weight division while Ld. Mark Allan Lusuegro ripped the silver medal in the middle weight division during the 2010 Arnis Philippines National Team Selection at the SM City North Edsa, Annex, Quezon City on June 25-27, 2010.

i-Arnis International and Arnis Philippines President Raymond S. Velayo graced the occasion. The event was sponsored by SM Corporation and Honorable Nanette Castelo- Daza of 4th Disctrict of Quezon City.

The 2010 Arnis Philippines National Team Selection was participated in by the medalist in by national level (Palarong Pambansa, Philippine Olympic Festival and National Arnis Encounter ) both in full contact and anyo events last 2007-2008 gold medalist and 2009 medalist.

Arnis Philippines (Arpi), Philippine Sports Commission (PSC), Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) and i-Arnis International spearheaded the activity.

Winners in this arnis national selection games will be representing Team Philippines in the upcoming i-Arnis International Encounter in Manila this year.


This renowned event aims to promote and popularize further the Filipino martial art and sport of
stick fighting in line with the REPUBLIC ACT NO. 9850 “An Act declaring Arnis as the National Martial Art and Sport of the Philippines”.

Filed under: Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Sorsogon News Updates, We will make you SHINE!, What's Happening Here?

What Successful People Do That You Are Missing

When you think of people who are successful names like Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Donald Trump, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffet may come to the front of your mind. What is it that has propelled them to achieve greatness. Are they built different? Do have a special ingredient or different DNA than other people? There are many qualities that define or separate someone who has achieved or will achieve greatness. What you are about to read will focus on three characteristics that these people have with one key difference, success people do what unsuccessful people won’t do. That is the key difference.

Goal Setting

Everyone who is successful sets goals. I’m sure you have heard this a million times. Do you have a goal for where you want to be in a year or five years? What will be different about your life next year and how will you make it happen? Successful people set goals but the way they handle goal setting enables them to actually reach and surpass what they want to do. Let’s take a one year time frame for example. You set a goal, an attainable goal for yourself for a year from now. A year is a long way away so in order to allow your mind to take you there you must break this one year down into a month and then a week and then a day. If you map out what you have to do in a day you can measure success after a week. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. That is the same way to approach your goals. Another tip is to write your one year goal on a small piece of paper. Figure out what you need to do each month and each day to meet this goal and write it below your one year goal. Laminate this and carry in your pocket everywhere you go. Make sure it is the first thing you look at in the morning and the last thing you see before your head hits your pillow at night.

Clear Vision and Focus

If you have ever watched Tiger Woods play golf you will see focus on a whole different level. It’s scary. His competitors can feel it and it can become very intimidating. He makes clutch putts that not only determine if he will win a major but also determine the difference in tens of thousands of dollars. Could you imagine standing over a golf ball with ten thousand people behind you. If you make it you win the Master’s and earn an additional $50,000 and you will be the top play on Sportscenter the next day. But if you miss you will be nothing and remember that moment for the rest of your life. He has practiced that situation so much that it doesn’t faze him when the real thing is right in front of his face. More times than not he makes that putt.

They Take Action And Are Not Afraid To Fail

Whether right or wrong successful people take action and do. They don’t sit around and wait on anything they get after it and take action. They are decision makers. One thing that makes someone successful at sports or business is that they get right back up if they have been beat down and failed at something. Michael Jordan was cut from the basketball team his freshman year of high school. That didn’t cause him to quit, that made him want to work harder to prove his coach wrong the next year. He went on to win 6 NBA titles, 5 MVPs, 6 finals MVPs, 2 Olympic gold metals, NCAA player of the year and a national champion. He never quit when the chips were down. He got right back up and went to work again.

Donald Trump filed bankruptcy twice. Many people would have given up and thrown in the towel on the first one. Donald knew he would overcome this hardship and he did. In 2007 he made $32 million and at that time his net worth was $1.6 billion. He continued to take action and now the Trump Empire is everywhere you turn. Mary Pickford has a famous quote that describes both Michael Jordan and Donald Trump. It says, “This thing that we call ‘failure’ is not the falling down, but the staying down.”

To sum it all up, successful people are not genetic phenomenons. It’s not in their DNA or their genes. They don’t have anything different about them than you. What separates them from the average person is that they set goals, have a clear vision, and most importantly, they take action and do rather than watch someone else succeed. Albert Einstein once said, “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Become someone great so that someday your name will be used in the article.

I am an online marketing coach. My goal is to help others reach their goals to become financially independent while by having a successful home based business. All the help you need and a step by step process to success is available at your fingertips. The only thing that is missing in this program is your ability and determination to put everything in place. To find out more information about me and this opportunity visit my blog at http://jonathanjones77.blogspot.com

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us,

A FATHERS DAY SPECIAL FOR OFWs

What you are about to watch  is the FATHERS role in the family when the Mother works overseas. In this video clip courtesy by MMK/ABS-CBN will show us the continuing exodus of mothers for jobs overseas,  this affects the behavioral development of children they leave behind.

I was so inspired to feature this story  because not  many Dad out there  are ready to take the role as  Mom or even become a good parent in  nurturing their children.

HAPPY FATHERS DAY TO ALL THE DADS OUT THERE!!!!

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, Overseas Jobs, Touching Heart, Touching Lives,

A Father is someone who wants to catch you before you fall

Papa, I can’t describe in words how much we love you. We really appreciate everything you did for us…specially the unconditional and non refundable funds 🙂 lol you have shared. You are the greatest Father in the whole world. HAPPY FATHERS DAY!!


A dad is someone who
wants to catch you before you fall


but instead picks you up,
brushes you off,
and lets you try again.

Father Day

A dad is someone who
wants to keep you from making mistakes
but instead lets you find your own way,
even though his heart breaks in silence
when you get hurt.


A dad is someone who
holds you when you cry,
scolds you when you break the rules,
shines with pride when you succeed,
and has faith in you even when you fail…

Dad Help Son to finish the race

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration

The 8 Principles of Fun

Guys, I came across an interesting site defining the 8 principles of fun and I hope this 5 minutes video clip will also give you joy, fun and tons of inspiration. Dios Mabalos!

Video Courtesy by: http://www.youtube.com/user/gringoyorgy

We don’t have enough fun in our lives.  Make the 8 irresistible principles of fun part of your life:

  • 1. Stop hiding who you really are.
    • Take the time to figure out what makes up your DNA
  • 2. Start being intensively selfish.
    • Get hungry for the things that are truly important to you
    • Stop wasting time on anything else
  • 3. Stop following the rules
    • Almost every rule is negotiable
  • 4. Start scaring yourself
    • Explore the edges
    • Dip your toes into the unknown
  • 5. Stop taking it all so damn seriously
  • 6. Start getting rid of the crap
    • Get rid of all that clutter
  • 7. Stop being busy
  • 8. Start something
    • There are always reasons to procrastinate just a little longer
    • ENOUGH!
    • Just Start!

Summary of the eight principles of fun:

  • 1 & 2: Get Focused
  • 3 & 4: Be Creative
  • 5 & 6: Use Your Wisdom
  • 7 & 8: Take Action

References: http://zemalf.posterous.com/the-eight-irresistible-principles-of-fun-27

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Touching Heart, Touching Lives

OFWs forced to get 2 jobs for children’s education

by Jocelyn Ruiz, ABS-CBN Europe News Buerau

ITALY – Overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) based in Italy are forced to take a second job aside from their regular work to support the education of their children in the Philippines.

They are obliged to double their remittances based on the needs of payment of tuitions, school materials and uniforms of their children.

Carmen Ilagan risked herself to work abroad for her three children who are all going to study in this school year.

Aside from her regular job as domestic helper, she is forced to get an extra job.

“Nag-doble ako ng trabaho at tumatanggap ako ng extra work at nang madagdagan ang aking kita para doble ang padala ko ngayong enrollment at pasukan na,” she said.

Ilagan feels the pain of being separated from her kids but she knows her sacrifices will bring a better life for her family.

She shared that she calls her children to monitor their situation and give them parental advice.

“Sinasabihan ko sila sa pagpasok sa school magdala ng payong o kapote pati na din dun sa katulong na nagdadala sa anak ko na 4 na taon sa kinder,” stated Ilagan.

Quality college education

OFW couple Benjie and Lita Eclarin have a hard time working together to support the college education of their daughter.

They said that they need to tighten their belt to provide for the needs of their daughter to pursue a college education in Manila.

“Kailangan sa panahon na ito ay tipid at higpit ng sinturon kasi hindi katulad ng ginagawa ng aming pamilya dahil may pinag-aaral pa kami na nasa college,” said Benjie. “Napakahirap magpaaral ng college.”

They also added that parents like them have the responsibility when education is concerned.

“Mahal na ang mga bilihin, ang lahat at obligasyon nating magpaaral ng anak dahil iyon lang ang maipapamana naming sa mga bata,” added Lita.

A grandma’s sacrifice

Meanwhile, a 67-year-old OFW grandmother, Linda de Villa, continues to work abroad for her grandchild’s education in the Philippines.

Lola Linda got emotional while sharing her story to the ABS-CBN Europe News Bureau.

Despite the fact that she is supposed to be enjoying her pension in the Philippines, Lola Linda said she needs to sacrifice to help her family back home.

“Handa na akong makapag-aral sila maski na ako ay walang pinag-aralan. Hindi nakaakyat ng hagdan, basta sila makaakyat,” she said.

Even if she feels sadness and homesickness, Lola Linda said she is still hoping that her grandchild will finish his schooling so that she can go home.

Increase in remittances

Based on the studies of remittance centers here in Italy, the estimated remittances of OFWs in the months of May and June will rise compared to last year because of the double remittances of OFWs for the education of their children.

“May palang nag-iipon na sila for enrollment, ito June for school supplies. Ang matindi lang ngayon ay ang pag-we-weaken ng euro sa dollar kaya mas malaking euro ang kanilang ipapadala compared sa last year,” said Elsa Lim, managing director of Land Bank of the Philippines Rome.

Lim added that OFWs are willing to sacrifice their salary for their families back home.

She also said that the OFWs are brave enough to take on the challenges of working abroad.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, Overseas Jobs,

Time to Re-think Brand Philippines?

by Robert Allen

“The thing is, we always shoot ourselves in the foot. And we never miss.” — Philippines Brand Owner

The election of Benigno ‘Noynoy’ Aquino as the Philippine’s new President marks both a progression and continuity in the country’s politics. The progression is a successful, democratic transfer of power, undertaken without the violence that has marred previous polls. The continuity is the election of a candidate from one of the Philippine’s ruling families. So will this president-elect represent continuity or change for the country’s brand?
June 12th marks the 112th anniversary of Philippine independence and the founding of nation’s representative democracy. The Philippines brand has historically been dominated by two factors: disappointing politics and the OFW (overseas Filipino worker). The first is the image of instability caused by repressive colonial history; followed by Ferdinand Marcos’ ransacking of the country’s economy (and his wife Imelda’s infamous shoe fetish).

The OFW phenomena is in part a response to the poor economic prospects this legacy bequeathed. Millions of ‘Pinoys’ work overseas as seamen, health workers and domestic helpers across South East Asia and beyond, seeking prospects denied to them at home.

In the Philippines, the image of these expats is mixed. The remittance they send back is a welcome boost for the economy, but many worry that the resultant strains on family life will outweigh the financial benefits. Others grumble that this exodus is a symptom of the failure of the domestic economy to develop sufficient opportunities for ambitious and motivated young people.

The external impact of these factors on the Philippine’s brand is an image of a country unable to develop, and a people worthy of aspiring to no higher than the bottom of the earning food chain. Sniggering tales of prospective Filipino maids asking if their meager wage included ‘headache money’ are a regular feature of expat dinner party chatter.

Attending a brand launch last year, your writer witnessed first hand the hurt this image causes. In the week before the launch the US TV show Desperate Housewives had featured a scene where an American character had refused to be treated by a Filipino doctor. The show had intended to highlight the snobbery and ignorance of the American character, and the situation portrayed had clearly struck a deep chord with the audience at the launch.

Almost quivering with indignation, the speaker had railed against the iniquity of the Philippine’s image abroad: They weren’t just launching a new company brand that day (she asserted) they were building a new Filipino brand of professionalism, technical prowess and customer service.

In fact, the seeds of a new brand image are already taking root. The very things that have made Filipinos employable in the lower paid service industries – welcoming, friendly personalities, attentive service, good English and hard working – are the very things that provide the platform for a new global Philippines brand.

The Philippines is already a strong rival to the (better branded) India in outsourced call centers, where patience and enunciation are vital. The last few years has seen a wave of Filipino companies using brand to develop their image and drive change through their businesses. Brands such as leading bank BDO are blending outstanding customer service with product development.

No doubt the new President will have many issues pressing for his attention. But perhaps now is the time to re-launch Brand Philippines to help both the OFW workers, and local companies carrying the burden of being global standard bearers.
Robert Allen is associate director, brand strategy, in Interbrand’s Singapore office. Rob has worked in branding, marketing, communications and research both client-side and as a consultant, with more than 15 years experience across Europe and Asia.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, Overseas Jobs, People who inspired Us, ,

Deodel Morada-overcoming hurdles

Isa na namang pagpapatunay na hindi hadlang ang kapansanan para matupad ang mga pangarap.  Sa video clip na kuha ng ABS-CBN ay ipinakita ni Deodel Morada ng Legaspi City Albay,   Kung paano nya nalampasan ang mga pagsubok ng aksidente syang maputulan ng mga kamay at paa. Tunay nga na kahanga-hanga ang kanyang talento. Mabuhay ka Deodel!

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration,

Sorsogon-Retiree sponsors PDI learning center

By Ephraim Aguilar, Inquirer Southern Luzon
Philippine Daily Inquirer

SORSOGON CITY—In a village named after its natural springs, her generosity gushes forth for poor children thirsty for learning.

Browsing through the pages of the Philippine Daily Inquirer, Rosalia Laganzo-Enerio, a recently retired government worker, found a way to help some 300 pupils of cash-strapped Bucalbucalan Elementary School.

She set aside part of her retirement money to sponsor a daily supply of newspapers and to put up an Inquirer Learning Corner (ILC) on the campus west of this city.

Having grown up in the same coastal village, the 66-year-old donor said it had long pained her to see the school still lacking books and updated resource materials, particularly those which could improve the students’ communication skills in English.

“By putting up a learning corner here in Bucalbucalan, the students will be provided with updated news and information. It will develop in them the good habit of reading,” Enerio said during Wednesday’s signing of a memorandum of agreement among her, the school and the Inquirer on Wednesday.

She said the majority of students here grew up without enjoying reading materials at home, items considered a luxury for their parents who eked out a living mostly as fishermen.

Education is close to Enerio’s heart. Before working for the National Manpower and Youth Council in 1975 and the National Housing Authority main office in 1981, she taught at Bucalbucalan Elementary School from 1968 to 1975.

Sensing the deterioration of the country’s educationsystem, Enerio left teaching and found employment elsewhere in the bureaucracy.

The search for better pay also drove her to switch jobs. Public school teachers at the time were paid a measly P212 a month, she recalled.

But even after quitting teaching, Enerio continued to support various projects on education. She volunteered, for example, for the Alitaptap Storytellers Philippines, a group that promotes literacy through the art of storytelling.

Every graduation season, Enerio would also donate medals to different schools in Sorsogon City.

But soon she realized that she had to give something that would leave a lasting impact on the students.

Enerio came across the Inquirer’s Learning section and read about the ILC program, wherein public schools can get free subscriptions to the Inquirer courtesy of reader-sponsors. The newspapers are to be kept in a school corner called “Inqspot” for easy access.

First non-politician donor

The ILC program is aimed at creating a place in public schools where teachers and students can read the paper and discuss the day’s news or issues.

Enerio said she had been an avid reader of the Inquirer since its founding during the martial law years, when the Marcos regime dismissed the fledgling but stinging newspaper as part of the so-called “mosquito press.”

Inquirer senior product manager Roselle Fortes-Leung said Enerio had the distinction of being the first ILC donor who is not a politician.

The ILC in Bucalbucalan is also the first to open in southern Luzon, Leung added.

Three ILCs have been set up earlier in Quezon City and Zambales province, all sponsored by politicians.

In honor of parents

“This is my way of giving back to the community and to this school in honor of my parents,” said Enerio, daughter of Feliza Aquende and Restituto Laganzo.

She said her parents, who were not able to finish their studies because of poverty, always reminded her and her siblings about the value of education, saying it’s the only priceless legacy they could give them.

School principal Antonio Jintalan gratefully acknowledged Enerio’s contribution: “We’re amazed that someone from this village is able to help this school.”

Jintalan said the ILC would go a long way in helping develop the children’s love for reading and their awareness of current events.

Mere P5,500 budget

Jintalan noted that the school, which operates on a measly budget of P5,500 for maintenance and other operational expenses, could only afford to set up a small library with books that were rarely updated.

A pity, Jintalan said, since “80 percent of our learning still comes from reading.”

With about 350 enrollees, the school has been relying heavily on private sponsors for its improvements, he said.

Enerio may no longer be able to go back to her first love—teaching—but she nevertheless vowed to continue her advocacy and community work for education.

The retiree called on other private citizens to do their share for the benefit of today’s youth and future generations.


Source: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20100607-274287/Retiree-sponsors-PDI-learning-center

Filed under: Community Service Group, Concerned Sorsoganon, Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, Natatanging Sorsoganon, Sorsogon News Updates, Touching Heart, Touching Lives, We will make you SHINE!, What's Happening Here?,

The quest for greener pastures

Once, the attraction of greener pastures abroad so consumed me that I finally decided to give it a try. With a seafaring father and a number of uncles and aunties who are OFWs themselves, it seemed natural for them to urge me to work outside abroad as well. In fact, they have been prodding me to apply abroad even while I was still in college because it is a sure way to earn big. As proof, I have enjoyed their pasalubongs and dollar souvenirs whenever they went home while I was growing up.

My father was able to send us to good schools, bought us “stateside” stuff, and generally made the whole family’s welfare better. However, deep inside of me is a dread that I find hard to explain because I know how difficult it is to be away from the surroundings I am accustomed to. I know how hard it is to adjust to a different culture, and deal with various types of people and a different working environment. I can’t help feeling wary of having to be alone, because I know it is so hard without any friends to share feelings with, without family to help me with problems, and without anybody to turn to especially in times of sickness.

Meanwhile, I cannot refute the fact that having a career abroad is one of the quickest ways to achieve my dreams. It is the ticket to which I will be able to afford a new car, build my future house and help my immediate family’s financial needs. Plus, I had this notion back then that if my relatives were able to do it, why can’t I? These are my inner conflicts before having decided — weighing my options up, down, and in-between because I want to really convince myself that it is for the best.

Finally, the lure of green bucks finally settled the matter for me. And so the process of preparing my papers and necessary travel documents started, and I was with high hopes that I will be accepted in a cruise liner fast. Coming from Cebu, I settled myself with an Aunt in Quezon City so that I can easily report to my agency’s office. This alone is sacrifice enough as I am not used to being away from Cebu for a long time. The first time I passed my application papers to the recruitment agency, I was told that I have to be in the waiting list. This is a big drawback for me because I wanted to work out of the country while my mind is still intent on it and get the process done in the soonest time possible. But with the seemingly long months that I have to wait, I know I have to find temporary work or else my family will incur lots of debt even before my application gets accepted. At this time, my father had now retired from being a seaman so the pressure on me was even greater.

I headed next to Clark, Pampanga, because a friend’s company based there was looking for a new inventory officer. There, I worked for four months, tried to adjust to the new surroundings and braved the homesickness that envelopes me most of the time. I considered it to be a little stint and a kind of exercise for me to be prepared when I have to work thousands of miles away from my homeland. When December came, I decided to file for leave to celebrate Christmas in my own hometown, but I no longer hold the conviction of working abroad. I planned to talk to my family about it and look for work in Cebu City instead.

Yes, after months of bearing the hardships of missing my family and everything that I hold dear, I chickened out. I decided that I will not go back to do follow ups for my cruise line application and to just forget everything about my grand dreams. That is, for now.

Hence, I congratulate every OFW out there who are brave and strong enough to sacrifice everything just so they can provide well for their family. I salute my aunties and uncles for looking after the welfare of their nieces and nephews and their other relatives even if they now have a family of their own. Most of all, I thank my father for having provided me with good education that equipped me with the right skills in faring well for the corporate world (wherever that world maybe). And to OFWs who are presently serving their contracts now, I say you are great heroes indeed!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Stanley Briyce Batao, 30, works as a web content writer for an SEO (search engine optimization) company.

Visit Link: http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=583060&publicationSubCategoryId=503

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, OFW Corner, Overseas Jobs,

National Migrants’ Day

In recognition of the great contributions of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) to nation-building, National Migrants Day is celebrated on June 7 each year.

The theme for the 15th National Migrants Day, “Migranteng Pinoy: Tagumpay sa Hamon ng Panahon, Kaagapay sa Pagsulong (Filipino Migrants: Success over the Challenge of Time, Partner in Progress)” highlights the resolve of the OFWs not only to make their and their families’ life more productive, but also to make worthwhile contributions in development, including raising money for medical equipment to funding capacity-building and microfinance for farmers.

The number of OFWs is not just rising in numbers but also in impact on the economy of the country. OFWs leave their homes in search of better-paying jobs abroad and contribute in keeping the economy afloat through their remittances to their families.

But working abroad and away from one’s family is a sacrifice. Behind the rosy picture of Filipino families living in financial stability with one or two members holding good-paying jobs abroad, leaving home exposes the OFW to bouts of loneliness, discrimination, and in the course of their employment, they are subjected to contract violations, abuse, and exploitation.

Despite the negative aspects of being an OFW, thousands of Filipinos leave for employment abroad each day. Truly they are our modern-day heroes who have helped our country achieve economic progress in the face of international fiscal turmoil.

Philippine expertise in labor working abroad is the country’s niche in the globalized world and should be given full support as part of the country’s national development agenda.


Source: http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/260829/national-migrants-day

Filed under: Inspiration, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner,

One-woman play ‘Miracle in Rwanda’ to open in Manila

By Josephine Darang
Philippine Daily Inquirer

THE LAST time I was in New York, in September 2008, my friend Loida Nicolas Lewis was proudly telling me that her daughter Leslie Lewis Sword was doing a one-woman play based on the book written by Immaculee Ilibagiza, a woman who survived the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, where almost a million Tutsis were massacred by members of the rival Hutu tribe.

“Miracle in Rwanda” will finally be shown in the Philippines in July 2010 at the Insular Auditorium in Makati, after its world premiere at the Theatre Zone in Naples, Florida, then at the New York Soho and other cities in the United States and other continents. Produced by the Lewis College in Sorsogon, the evening performance on July 16 has been bought by the Cofradia de la Inmaculada Concepcion Foundation through vice chair Danny Dolor. Executive producer is Roger Chua.


For tickets, please text Liza (secretary of Loida Lewis) at 0919-4103770.

Leslie Sword, a graduate of Harvard and UCLA Schools of Theater, Film and Television, plays the role of Immaculee and delineates the roles of six other characters. The award-winning actress is the daughter of Fil-Am philanthropist and civic leader Loida Nicolas-Lewis and the late lawyer Reginald Lewis. Leslie crafted the play with co-creator Edward Vilga after Leslie traveled to Rwanda with Immaculee.

Immaculee’s family was brutally murdered during the three-month slaughter that began in April 1994. For 91 days, she and six other women huddled silently cramped together in an undiscovered extra bathroom in a local pastor’s home. Loida told me the women constantly prayed the Rosary while they were there. The “miracle” was that the women were able to survive, and that, for Immaculee’s part, she was able to forgive the murderers.

Teaching catechism

For the past 30 years, the Catholic Women’s League of Silay, Negros Occidental, has been teaching catechism to public school students. In 1981, the San Diego Parish catechetical committee invited pianists Della Gamboa Besa and Annie de Guzman for a fundraising concert called “Tribute Musical,” in honor of the late Perla Velez Gamban. It was Gamban who raised funds to support and maintain the tremendous undertaking of bringing God to public-school children.

The program is presently under the auspices of the Catholic Women’s League of Silay. Della and Annie were asked again to perform in a “Homecoming Love Offering” on February 13 at the Jose Locsin Civic Center. They performed an all-Filipino repertoire. In charge of the event were CWL president Evalyn Tan and directors Ma. Rosa Gamban and Ruska Gamban.

Filed under: Encouragement, Films, Inspiration, Movie, Sorsogon News Updates, , ,

To all of you who feel like giving up

I was actually looking  for inspirational video updates in youtube. But what I found here was a short video clip by a guy named “NICK VUJICIC” . He got no arms & legs  but he  always said  no worries 🙂 . Truly GOD is amazing, He will give us someone like Nick to inspired us. He could transforms weeknesses into strengths, tragedies to blessings and failures to miracles. I guess, its not a coincidence for me coz I’m  having  trouble finding that strength too.

To Nick Vujicic, Thanks a lot for sharing this video to us. You’ re truly an inspiration &  blessings to someone who are suffering from the same!! LONG LIVE!!

Kung natumba, bangon guiraray!! watch it for yourself guys!

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Motivation, People who inspired Us, , , , ,

Lessons from thousands of miles away

By Chao Wai Yee /philstar.com

Being a child of a modern-day hero, also known as OFWs, taught me a lot of valuable lessons. My mother, being a single parent since I was three years old, worked abroad for eight years in order to raise me and my brother. At first, she worked in Taiwan as a sewer. After her contract in Taiwan ended, she transferred to Saudi where she almost got herself in prison because she fought for her rights. Fortunately, her employer gave her the option to just go back in the Philippines.

This incident did not stop her for striving hard. She went back to Taiwan and worked there as a caregiver. These things happened while me and my brother were in our adolescence — a stage crucial to most of the youth, a stage wherein most of us needs proper guidance from our parents. Despite my mother’s physical absence, she did not fail to guide us the best possible way that she can. Together with all her sacrifices, hardships, longings, sleepless nights and thousands liters of tears, she taught us values that we will treasure for the rest of our lives.

First, she taught us to always strengthen our faith in God no matter what happens. In telephone conversations and in her letters, she kept on telling us that our strong faith is the first thing that will keep our family together and will help us succeed in overcoming the obstacles we will face in our lives. Then, she taught us to be independent in a responsible way. During grade school, we learned to cook, wash our own clothes and be responsible for our own stuffs. This helped us to become more mature than other children we know. Third, it is the value of education, which I think is one of the things that most parents would want to teach to their children. My mother instilled in our minds on how important it is for us to study hard and finish our studies no matter what the obstacles are. That is why, I am proud to say that Kuya and I are both scholars and I graduated from a reputable school with flying colors. These are our gifts to our mother, which brought her so much happiness and seeing her happy is one of the greatest feelings I have ever felt and would always want to feel.

Last but definitely not the least is the value of contentment and appreciation. Because with contentment comes appreciation. She taught us to value whatever it is that we have especially the people surrounding us, loving us and acting as our second parents during Mama’s physical absence. We learned to appreciate our aunts, uncles and grandparents who never failed to fill our hearts with their loves so as to ease the sadness that we feel whenever we miss our mother. Because of them, it has been a lot easier for us to grow up righteously even without our parents. I will seriously not trade my family for even all the treasures in this universe. Also, we learned to appreciate and be thankful for even the smallest things that we get. Be it a piece of toy, clothes or anything for we know that each of this is the result of our mother’s hard work and sacrifices abroad. These are some of the lessons she taught us from thousands of miles away.

OFW’s around the world are sacrificing a lot for the sake of their loved ones, especially the parents who are forced to be physically far from their children just to support their financial needs. I hope that we, OFW children, don’t waste our parents’ efforts and sacrifices abroad. Let us not make the physical absence of our parents and loved ones as an excuse for us to be irresponsible be an additional burden to our society.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, Kwentong OFW, OFW Corner, Overseas Jobs, Youth

DepEd Library Hub Project

We would like to thank the people behind the continued development of the DepEd Library Hubs. As we all know that library is a treasure-house of knowledge. The Schools in Sorsogon and the neighbouring towns will benefit from this Project.

LIBRARY HUB FEATURED OVER GMANews.TV

DEPED LIBRARY HUB INFO: http://libraryhub.ning.com/

Rationale

If every child is to be functionally literate, there must be an infrastructure that makes available reading materials to support this agenda. However, the problem besetting the public schools in the country is the prohibitive cost of setting up libraries.

Hence, in 2003, the Department of Education (DepED), through the office of the Undersecretary for Finance and Administration, launched the Library Hub Project as one of its innovative initiatives. This project aims to develop the love for and habit of reading among public school pupils and students through building a warehouse of supplementary reading materials called the Library Hub. The Hub is anchored on the principle that every child can develop desirable reading habits and skills through greater access to reading materials. Ultimately, it will create pervasive reading culture and environment in public schools. Under the Project, the Department is tapping the support and cooperation of both internal and external stakeholders.

The Vision

A functional Library Hub in every schools division is a reservoir of reading materials envisioned to develop among pupils and students the love for and habit of reading.

The Mission

The Library Hub equipped with adequate and varied quality supplementary reading materials for public elementary and secondary schools shall be established in all schools divisions nationwide.

The Goal

In order to attain its vision and mission, at least one Library Hub shall be established in every schools division nationwide by 2010.

Objectives:

The Library Hub Project aims to:

  1. Provide greater access to reading materials to all public school pupils and    students through Library Hubs
  2. Provide quality and appropriate books to public schools nationwide
  3. Develop the love for books and habit of reading
  4. Make every Filipino child a book lover
  5. Support the development of reading and comprehension skills of public school pupils and students

LIBRARY HUB FEATURED OVER GMANews.TV

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Government, Inspiration, Sorsogon News Updates

I LOOK OUT THE WINDOW TO SEE MY HOUSE – A must-read for all Pinoys

BY TOTO CAUSING
Auditor & Legal Consultant,
National Press Club

I am glad that there are still Filipinos who care for and hope for their leaders.

At least, we have a common ground: we all love RP. The differences start when each of us begins to express and exercise beliefs in political leaders who, most often, ended up consumed by greed, and when each begins to insist what everyone of us believes to be what should be given us–even without working for it.

Then we have seen groups of Filipinos who cannot be contented with what they have and who would blame other Filipinos for their miseries, which blame is partly true and partly false.

All our woes have run to the extent that I have come to the point of saying there is no change that we can believe in that would ever happen in this nation once called “the banana republic.”

I blame this on ourselves–and myself–in the first place and on our leaders who craftily played on our unwillingness to respond accordingly to preserve what is correct and what is right, morally, politically and economically. We have exhibited our hesitance at a chance for patriotism in dozens of occasions. I call it a disillusion that has gripped me and most of us.

Obviously amongst us, there are two major forces that control the action of each: (1) personal attitude; and (2) exploitation by leaders. There may be other factors, but these are the two prominent figures in my mind at this time of writing.

As is true in Christian communities, the bigger mass of Muslim Filipinos are gripped by their attitude on how to react and behave toward their Christian kababayans and this provided a perfect scenario for their leaders to play with them.

We can easily see the formation of attitude in each Muslim Pinoy largely depend on what one learns since childhood. If a Muslim child learns hatred against Christians at a very young age it will linger till eternity; if he learns the values of reading, writing, good behavior and critical thinking it will reign in him in his lifetime. This hatred is taught by the actions and conversations of their parents in the domestic homes. Unfortunately, many Muslim parents now have not gone to school to learn reading non-Arabic letters and figures and the culture of Filipinos who don’t pray like them. This is the reason any Muslim Filipino would readily embrace an idea if one is proposed for them to break away from the Philippines with the punctuation line of discrimination.

We can also see the lack of learning among the Christian communities. Ask any Christian in the Visayas or Luzon and many of them do not even know places in Mindanao made popular by Yoyoy Villame. Perhaps, the most that would come to mind to many a non-Mindanaoan are provinces such as Cotabato owing to the song of Asin, Davao, Lanao, Zamboanga, Jolo and Basilan owing to the news headlines. One of our biggest mistakes is the failure to include in the elementary curricula subjects and researches about Muslim Filipinos to promote better understanding of their life and culture–and to teach Christian Filipinos a lifetime lesson that they are not the only Filipinos.

Due to this “sin of ignorance” that we all commit because each of us has done not enough, we can readily see Christian Filipinos’ stereotypes at the sight of a Muslim counterpart. In the same manner a Christian Filipino would be discriminated against when he happens to stray in Lanao, Maguindanao or Sulu islands. This should not happen.

Nevertheless, we are thankful that, at least, the corrupt and corrupted system of public education has lifted a sign of hope that at least there is that little understanding that is observable; although the deep-seated hatred and bias against each other is still there. This little progress has seen the rise of Maranao traders now found in almost every town or city across Philippines. Of all Muslim tribes here, it is this Lake People who are most prone to adjust to Christian traditions; I credit this to the success of my alma mater, the Mindanao State University in Marawi and Iligan. MSU has served as a good melting pot for intelligent Muslims and Christians who must have reechoed to their respective homes what they learned from this great institution founded in 1961 by professors and academicians from the UP; the throng was led by Dr. Antonio Isidro. That gambit has proved as an excellent formula for the promotion of understanding between Islam and Christianity, two holy concepts that are seemingly a world apart from each other. And I write this piece in partial payment for the full scholarship it granted me to graduate with a BS Civil Engineering course despite my parents’ indigence.

Apparently, education is the only sure solution to create a big potential for a lasting and more permanent peace and prosperity in Muslim Mindanao and in any Christian community.

So that I have harbored a Filipino Dream which I see can only happen in every Pinoy if he or she is given a chance at a good public education system. And the only way to achieve this dream is for us to start this in our kids while they are young. So why not start ’em young?

A matter of education is for a country to do because it is beyond the capacity of any citizen, who can contribute the most by compelling or inspiring their young to go to school, making sure these kids study at home before giving stuff toys or a play station a time, working to give them food so that they would not study with empty stomach, and teach them some supplemental lessons.

This I urge in the belief that it is not enough to ask “what you can do to your country” but to answer readily when asked “what your country can do to you.”

Despite this glaring picture of ignorance which is too big to stay unnoticed, our local leaders have not seen that the only solution is a “good public education,” one that teaches not only how to read, write and compute but one that also teaches a child to think critically at a young age of seven and opens his mind to the cultures of people who don’t look like him and who don’t worship like him. This kind of knowledge is far better than the “current events” that show a President saying “I am sorry” over the “Hello Garci Fraud”, a Comelec official dangling “Sec, may 200 (million) ka dito”, a President who is in prison, thereafter convicted and later pardoned, a “Joc-Joc Bolante making a joke out of fertilizer funds”, Court of Appeals justices who would quarrel over one ordinary case, and many others.

If we could only turn back the hands of time and if I would have my way, I would have dangled more than half of the country’s wealth in a massive high-standard public education in elementary and secondary levels free for all the kids and would leave them fight for their way to college. This I would do because I believe that the success in admission tests for UP and other excellent schools depend on how much a child learns in his or her lower level education. I also believe that it is enough that our people will be informed, intelligent and critical-thinking high school graduates for them to serve as a very potent force to drive our economy to prosperity and our community to tranquility.

We cannot turn back the time, but we can always start anew and take the correct steps, one at a time. But how when it has become an egg-to-chicken-to-egg story for us courtesy of our politicians?

Honestly, I have become desperate. In all government offices graft and corruption has become the rule of the game; so that when they cry out “rule of law” they actually mean “law of rule”. A simple license or permit cannot be obtained without extra fees for the people tasked to perform them. A victim of a crime cannot be assured of justice unless he gives for the law enforcers to move. Nearly every law passed has become a source of income by plenty of public officers who are willing not to implement the law for a price.

A poor man cannot litigate his case even if he has merit. There are countless of obstacles. Before the fiscal’s office alone, good evidence and meritorious arguments and without more are not enough to ensure a victory in any preliminary investigation. In the courts, the big bumps are these: (a) prohibitive filing fees and strict-yet-out-of-touch rules in order to avail of indigent’s privilege to sue; (b) overly technical court procedures that not even intelligent laymen can understand; (c) free legal aids of the Public Attorney’s Office (PAO) that are not efficient if a poor client does not give “padulas”; (d) stringent bar prohibiting non-lawyer litigants to sue and defend suit by themselves; and (e) prohibitive requirements put up by the Supreme Court for lawyers to practice, like the Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) that consists only of seminars that are not effective in achieving the purpose, which requirements, in effect, force lawyers to spend more for them to be allowed to practice in court, among others.

These, I believe, are still a product of our “sin of ignorance.” We know it but we refuse to learn.

Now, let me ask. How may intelligent Muslim Filipino leaders who have passed to be genuine to their own constituencies? Can we count Nur Misuari in? Can we count in the dynastic family of Kiram of the Sultanate of Sulu? Can we count in the Dimaporos? Can we count in the Ampatuans in Maguindanao? Can we count in the Tamano clansmen? Can we count in the Pendatuns? Can we count in the Sinsuats? Can we count in the Mangudadatus of Sultan Kudarat province? Can we count in Sultan Kudarat himself?

Though I have high hopes in Adel Tamano, a Harvard fellow and the current president of Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila where I obtained my law degree in 2005, I don’t know how to reconcile the riches providing insulting contrasts to the have-nots masses who follow them.

Maguindanaons could have been lucky to have Toto Paglas who succeeded in converting the small town of Buluan into a banana plantation. But the good die young. Allah has just taken him while he was still very young and vibrant. An industrialist like him is what Cotabato needs to power up its wide tract of idle lands.

Now, how many Christian Filipino leaders have passed to genuinely work for their people? They say Magsaysay is one, but the sad truth is that the true good moment is brief because the good die young.

It is these kinds of political leaders that we have that have led me to look out of my window, see the world, and compare where my country lies.

Thus, I enjoy seeing other countries’ good politicians and love criticizing those I see as bad guys. The ones who attracted my attention are American politicians Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, John McCain and Sarah Palin. The good examples they have shown have led me to dream and wake up one day in the Philippines having the likes of them. Then there is this Pakistan’s Musharaff, a dictator that I hated once but now admire more than my President for having the courage to resign when all chips are down. A few weeks back, Japan’s prime minister announced he will voluntarily leave after knowing his leadership failing. In the better end of the view, I saw the rise of a Pakistan named Zadari, a man who, for decades, have lived in the shadows of his wife whose death caused his star to shine in a story similar to Cory Aquino benefiting from her spouse’s death.

In looking out the window, I learned the distinctions between my house and the rest; I learned to discover the defects in my own dwelling and I have come to better learn which column or beam to replace and what kind of foundation should I make in order to make the real strong republic. I also learned that Muslim and Christian children can be joined block by block, brick by brick, to form one sturdy house called “Philippines.”

As I close the window for tomorrow, I dream to see my native land singing: “There is no Muslim Filipino, there is no Christian Filipino, there is no mountain Filipino, there is only ONE FILIPINO.”

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, What's Happening Here?, ,

Emergency Telephone Numbers

A very interesting email from my friend “Melanie”. Thank you for sharing this phone numbers.

These are more effective than 911

DIRECT LINE:  dial Jeremiah 33:3

WHEN>>
You are sad, phone John 14
You have sinned, phone Psalm 51
You are facing danger, phone Psalm 91
People have failed you, phone Psalm 27
It feels as though God is far from you, phone Psalm 139
Your faith needs stimulation, phone Hebrews 11
You are alone and scared, phone Psalm 23
You are worried, phone Matthew 8:19-34
You are hurt and critical, phone 1 Corinthians 13
You wonder about Christianity, phone 2 Corinthians 5:15-18
You feel like an outcast, phone Romans 8:31-39
You are seeking peace, phone Matthew 11:25-30
It feels as if the world is bigger than God, phone Psalm 90
You need Christ like insurance, phone Romans 8:1-30
You are leaving home for a trip , phone Psalm 121
You are praying for yourself , phone Psalm 87
You require courage for a task, phone Joshua 1
Inflation’s and investments are hogging your thoughts, phone Mark 10:17-31
You are depressive, phone Psalm 27
Your bank account is empty, phone Psalm 37
You lose faith in mankind, phone 1 Corinthians 13
It looks like people are unfriendly, phone John 15
You are losing hope, phone Psalm 126
You feel the world is small compared to you, phone Psalm 19
You want to carry fruit, phone John 15
Paul’s secret for happiness, phone Colossians 3:12-17
With big opportunity/ discovery, phone Isaiah 55
To get along with other people, phone Romans 12


ALTERNATE NUMBERS


For dealing with fear, call Psalm 47
For security, call Psalm 121:3
For assurance, call Mark 8:35
For reassurance, call Psalm 145:18



ALL THESE NUMBERS MAY BE PHONED DIRECTLY.
NO OPERATOR ASSISTANCE IS NECESSARY.
ALL LINES TO HEAVEN ARE AVAILABLE 24 HOURS A DAY.
FEED YOUR FAITH, AND DOUBT WILL STARVE TO DEATH

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration,

Filipino-American Athlete Wins New England’s “Karate Kid” Challenge and Needs Help in Internet Voting

Written by Audrey Reyes-So/Mabuhay Radio     

Photo Credit: Mat Corral

 Steven So, an American karate enthusiast of Filipino descent, won the Karate Kid challenge at Six Flags theme park in New England. He is now competing through online voting with the other winners from all the Six Flags locations in the United States. The winner gets to go to the “Karate Kid” movie premiere and meet the cast.
 
To participate in the online voting, interested Filipinos anywhere in the world simply have to access this hyperlink,
www.yahoovoteforthekaratekid.com
 

The online voting will end on Tuesday, May 25, 2010, at midnight (Eastern Standard Time). Votes can be cast once per day until May 25th.
 

Steven and his sensei are under the entry:
Brian C., Steven S.
Springfield, MA
Six Flags New England

 
Steven So is the taller guy to the left in the flyer and video. He is a scion of the So Family of Matnog, Sorsogon Province in the Bicol Region, Philippines. 

Source: http://www.mabuhayradio.com/sections/sports/6134-filipino-american-athlete-wins-new-englands-karate-kid-challenge-and-needs-help-in-internet-voting.html

Filed under: Get Involved, Inspiration, Show your pride, Sorsogon News Updates, We will make you SHINE!, , ,

Sorsogon first eco-house project

MANILA, Philippines—Filipino-Australian Edith Gapas-Dome neither drives a hybrid car nor shops exclusively at natural food and beauty stores. And she doesn’t lose sleep worrying about climate change.

But she is showing the way on how to go green in the house that is taking shape in her hometown of Bulusan, Sorsogon.

Her planned house would make that passionate environmentalist Al Gore proud.

ecohouse111wq5to9

To name a few of the house’s earth-friendly features, the roof will be made of PVC instead of the usual corrugated GI sheets, the concrete walls will have polystyrene (styrofoam) in the middle, and the rooms will be decked out with nontoxic paint.

Even the appliances that will be bought are rated to use less electricity, and the bathroom and kitchen fixtures that will be installed are designed to use less water.

First in RP

“My husband and I weren’t planning to go green when we decided to build some sort of a retirement house in Bulusan. But when our architect described the benefits—lower electricity and water bills, better indoor-air quality, plus the fact that we will not be spending a lot of money—we agreed that it would be worth it,” Dome said.

Dome will be the first in the Philippines to benefit from the LuzViMinda Eco-House project that ModernA launched a few months ago.

ModernA is a small but dedicated group of architects that promotes energy-efficient and environmentally sound housing designs for middle-income Filipino home buyers.

Its first project is LuzViMinda Eco-House, which will build relatively inexpensive houses with a low adverse impact on the environment.

“It’s not easy to buy or build an affordable eco-house here in the Philippines. A lot of home buyers here think that green architecture has a price premium and that it’s only for people who can afford it,” explained architect James Jao, who conceived and co-founded ModernA.

“The need for eco-friendly house designs is becoming increasingly urgent. Sadly, this issue has to take a back seat here in the Philippines, where a lot of Filipinos are homeless or living in substandard housing,” he lamented.

Blueprint

But Jao, who completed a bachelor’s degree in architecture at the University of Santo Tomas and a master’s degree in city design and social science at the London School of Economics and Political Science, believes that the LuzViMinda Eco-House project will prove that a middle-income Filipino family can afford to enjoy sustainable living.

To drive home this point, Jao’s team built a mock eco-house and displayed it during the recent Manila Construction Show 2008 held at the SMX Convention Center in the SM Mall of Asia Complex in Pasay City.

According to Jao, the 121-square-meter house (with a 33-square-meter garage and a 20-square-meter loft) serves as a blueprint of Dome’s future house—25 percent more energy-efficient, cheaper to build, and, best of all, constructed in accordance with the strict and world-renowned building regulation standards of the United Kingdom.

“While [the mockup] costs over P1.5 million to build, the price of the actual house is expected to be much lower,” Jao said. “But on the other hand, even at P1.5 million, Dome will no longer have to spend so much on energy and water bills and be able to enjoy a healthy environment with her family.”

Dome said part of the agreement with ModernA was to open her eco-house to the public on certain days for viewing.

Said Jao: “The objective is to gain more support and to prove to more Filipino home buyers that they don’t need to spend much to acquire an environment-friendly house.”

He added that another eco-house was being planned in Cebu.

Green strategies

The way Jao explained it, a LuzViMinda Eco-House utilizes forward-thinking green strategies that promote energy efficiency, conservation and quality of life while taking advantage of the economic benefits of green architecture to keep living costs down.

For example, the PVC roof can reflect 90 percent of the sun’s heat, keeping the house’s interior cool even during the summer months.

The concrete walls with styrofoam filling are not only lightweight and thinner than the hollow-blocks-and-cement combination but are also more durable and provide a more effective barrier to external heat and noise.

Jao is adding a filtration system to allow the use of rainwater for cleaning or watering plants.

Local materials

For lighting, a solar panel will be installed, as well as energy-saving lamps positioned throughout the house. This setup, Jao said, could provide monthly savings of P1,200 on electricity.

All the materials used in the mockup and in the house being built in Bulusan are available locally, Jao said.

Green guide

He said his group spent some time researching “to determine each of the materials’ eco-friendliness” because unlike Europe and the United States, the Philippines had no “green guide” to provide “product recommendations and their relative environmental impacts.”

For a green guide, Jao consulted England’s Code for Sustainable Homes but made some revisions to make it appropriate for the Philippines.

The code works by awarding new homes a star rating from one to six, based on their performance against nine sustainability standards—energy and carbon dioxide emissions, water, materials, surface water runoff, waste, pollution, health and well-being, management, and ecology.

On top of everything else, the LuzViMinda Eco-House project is very flexible in terms of design and materials, Jao said.

“In fact, if the national or local government will provide tax-support incentives, for example—the construction price could go much lower that even mass housing developers may be able to afford it.”


‘Green’ home to rise in Bulusan
Charles E. Buban
Philippine Daily Inquirer

Filed under: Green Living, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Sorsogon News Updates, What's Happening Here?, , , ,

Jovit Baldivino-an Ordinary boy with Extraordinary voice

Last  Saturday night, I was so excited to watch the semi finals of Pilinas Got Talent because I am following Jovit Baldivino’s next performance…and my waiting paid off.  When he sang the song popularized by Europe Band “Carrie”, it was another amazing performance that caused the audience to give him an standing ovation. I believed that he will be the next Arnel Pineda or Bugoy Drilon. What do you think?  PGT judge Ai Ai said “tumatayo ang aking balahibo”:) :), while Kris Aquino reagrded him as the “Male version of  Charice Pempengco”. Wow! I didn’t expect Jovit to actually possess a voice like that of European Band’s vocalist & the legendary Journey-Steve Perry.

I was so inspired to feature him on this site to give  tribute and  to those who have the power to make their dreams come true. Because this is what our youth needs today. He  just  proven that poverty is not a hindrance to success. That our youth must aim high and follow their dreams and never give up. Truly, Jovit Baldivino is a good model for our youth. I am sure that we can see a lot more of him in the future.

His touching story …..

  • A humble 16-year old  who was born to a poor parents from Marilag, Batangas
  • He used to sell Siomai at the market after his classes to augment his family income
  • He joined the audition to help his family and to become a good example among the youth.
  • His simple wish is to finish studies and his own little way help his parents.
  • He won the audition by singing “faithfully” as popularized by journey.
  • He wants to  become a popular singer.
  • He quoted that “win or loss” he is proud to be a Filipino showing his talent to the whole world.

Sorsogoñeous! join me in hearing his music, his story plus his simple dreams.

When lights go down, I see no reason
For you to cry. We’ve been through this before
In every time, in every season,
God knows I’ve tried
So please don’t ask for more.

Can’t you see it in my eyes
This might be our last goodbye

Carrie, Carrie, things they change my friend
Carrie, Carrie, maybe we’ll meet again somewhere again

I read your mind, with no intentions
Of being unkind, I wish I could explain
It all takes time, a whole lot of patience
If it’s a crime, how come I feel no pain.

Carrie, Carrie, things they change my friend
Carrie, Carrie, maybe we’ll meet again

Carrie, Carrie, things they change my friend
Carrie, Carrie, maybe we’ll meet again somewhere again

***********************************************************************VOTE FOR JOVIT :  PGT JOVIT Send to 2331 for Globe,TM,Sun,Bayan 231 for Smart,TNT = 1 VOTE PGT3 JOVIT Send to 2366 …

Voting for Pilipinas Got Talent

Voting period: Saturdays to Sunday starting May 1 until June 13

Viewers of Pilipinas Got Talent may support their favourite PGT semi-finalist every Saturday and Sunday through the following:

A. LOCAL SMS VOTING

1. Text PGT (name of contestant)
And send to:

* 2331 for Globe, TM, Sun Cellular and Bayan Phone Extra subscribers
* 231 for Smart and Talk ‘N Text subscribers

Tariffs: P2.50/vote for Globe, TM, Bayan Phone Extra, Smart and Talk ‘N Text subscribers
P2.00/vote for Sun Cellular subscribers

*Viewers may also utilize PGT bulk voting by keying in:

For SMART and SUN CELLULAR subscribers:

2. Text:

* PGT3 (contestant’s name) to 2366. P5 for 3 votes
* PGT8 (contestant’s name) to 2366. P10 for 8 votes

**No CAP/Maximum number of votes**

For GLOBE subscribers:

Give 5 votes & get a picture message by texting PGT5 (contestant’s name) to 2366
*P15 for 5votes and picture message
** Maximum of 30downloads PER CONTESTANT per day.

Give 6 votes & get an MMS wallpaper by texting (contestant’s name) to 2366
*P20 for 6votes and mms wallpaper
** Maximum of 30downloads PER CONTESTANT per day.

3. Viewers may also text PGT BULK to 2366 for information on bulk voting.
P2.50 for Globe, TM, Smart and Talk ‘N Text subscribers and P2.00 for Sun Cellular subscribers.

4. Viewers may also get additional 3 free votes once they register. To avail:

Text PGTREG (name of contestant) (name/age/gender/address)
And send to

* 2331 for Globe, TM, Sun Cellular and Bayan Phone Extra subscribers
* 231 for Smart and Talk ‘N Text subscribers

Tariff: P2.50/vote for Globe, TM, Bayan Phone Extra, Smart and Talk ‘N Text subscribers
P2.00/vote for Sun Cellular subscribers

***Each mobile number can avail of the free REG votes only once during the entire season***

B. INTERNATIONAL SMS VOTING

JAPAN

Brastel Smart Phonecard Holders (via IVR):
To vote and save a contestant: Dial 0091-2074-0011 – [Candidate No] – [No of Votes]

Ex: To vote for [Candidate no. 21] with as many as 10 votes, dial:
0091-2074-0011-21-10

The call will be received by an automated answering service that will:
1. Give affirmative and thank you remark if successful, or
2. Error tones if failed.

Tagalog customer service numbers:
Free dial :0120-659-535
From Mobile : 03-5637-5905

Vote Package:
1 vote = Y40
5 votes = Y140
10 votes = Y200
30 votes = Y540

Telecallnet Subscribers (mobile email):
For information to vote:

Type pgt@tctxt.jp in the To area and PGT in the message body

To Vote:

Type pgt@tctxt.jp in the To area
Type (Number of votes)#(name of contestant) in the message body
Example to Save: 10#Snap

Vote Package:
1 vote = Y40
5 votes = Y140
10 votes = Y200
30 votes = Y540

UAE

Etisalat Subscribers
For more information, Text PGT to 4200
To vote and save a contestant, text PGT (contestant name) to 4200

Available only to Etisalat subscribers
AED3/vote

C. ONLINE VOTING

Go to:

http://www.abs-cbn.com/pgtvoting.aspx

1. Then, log in using your TFC Now account to be able to vote.
2. Enter the PIN code of your ABS-CBN vote card
3. Select or click on chosen contestant candidate.
Tariffs: P25 for 10 votes
P75 for 30 votes
4. Then, click vote now button.

***All the votes corresponding to the value of the card will be given to that one candidate you have voted for***

NOTE:

1. Voting for each week will open at the end of the performance show on Saturdays upon the live cue of the hosts. Voting will close the following day during the results show on Sundays upon the live cue of the hosts.

2. The time reflected in ABS-CBN Interactive’s system shall be the official time reference. PGT votes received beyond the official cut-off time and voting period will not be counted.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Show your pride, We will make you SHINE!, , , ,

How to Reduce the Stress in Your Life

Stress is something that we all have to deal with each and every day. There’s work related stress, relationship stress and financial stress just to name a few. If we don’t develop effective strategies for dealing with stress, it can lead to many problems including physical illness.

stress free

One of the most effective strategies for reducing your stress levels is to learn to live your life in day-tight compartments.

Let me explain…

When ship builders design passenger ships, they divide the ship into sections and between each section they place a water-tight door to create several separate compartments.

water-tight compartments

If one of the compartments is flooded, the ship’s captain can close the water-tight doors and the ship will continue to stay afloat.

Imagine for a moment that your life is a series of compartments each made up of a single day. On either side of each day is a day-tight door.

Just as the water-tight doors in a ship block out water and prevent the boat from sinking, your day-tight doors block out the past and future and prevent your outlook on life from sinking.

In your day-tight compartment, you do not have to analyze the past or worry about the future.

All you have to deal with is today.

day-tight compartment

When I was working 70+ hour weeks in the corporate world, I found this day-tight compartment strategy to be a useful form of stress management.

Each morning I would imagine that I was closing my day-tight doors. This helped me to stop analyzing the past and prevented me from worrying about the future. I could then simply focus on what I had to do in the next 24 hours.

Often when I talk to people about living their life in day-tight compartments someone will ask “Don’t you need to visualize your future everyday in order to make it a reality? How can I do that if I’m living in a day-tight compartment?”

This is a very good question. The answer is that you first visualize your future goal in its entirety and then determine what small step you can achieve today. Next, you bring this single step inside your day-tight compartment and shut your day-tight doors.

In this way you are not intimidated by the size of your overall goal and can just focus on what you need to do today while still moving steadily towards your achieving your long term goals.

So the next time you are under stress, try taking a deep breath and make the decision to live your life in day-tight compartments. Each morning, imagine closing your day-tight doors on the past and the future.

During the day, if you catch yourself analyzing the past or worrying about the future, remember that these thoughts do not belong in your day-tight compartment and try and let them go.

By learning to live your life in day-tight compartments, you can greatly reduce your stress levels and lead a happier and healthier life.

———————————————————————————————

Thanks to Dr. Anthony Fernando – www.anthonyfernando.com

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us,

B E L I E V E I N Y O U R S E L F!

This is an inspirational video clip that remind us about the importance of believing in ourselves. I would like to share it with you hoping that this will enlighten your day.  I would like to thank Ms. Laura Burns for sharing such great article. GOD SPEED!

B E L I E V E   I N   Y O U R S E L F!

Sometimes people coming into your life
and you know right away that they were
meant to be there…

To serve some sort of purpose, teach you a lesson
and help figure out who you are..or who you want to become

You never know who these people may be,
but when you lock eyes with them,
you know that at every moment
they will affect your life
in some profound way.

You realize that without
overcoming those
obstacles you would
never have realized
your potential, your strength,
you will power or your heart

EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON.
Nothing happens by chance or by means of good luck.
illness, enjury, love, last moment of true greatness
and sheer stupidity all occurs to test the limit of your soul.

Without these small tests
life would be like a smoothly paved,
straight flat road to nowhere
safe and comportable but dull and otherly pointless

THE PEOPLE YOU MEET AFFECT YOUR LIFE.
The successes and downfalls
that you experience can create who you are.
and the bad experience can be learned from
in fact they’re probably the most emotional and
the most important one.

If someone hurts you,
betrays you or breaks your heart,
FORGIVE THEM….
Because they have help you learned to about trust
and the important of being concious.

If someone loves you, love them back,
unconditionally, Not only because they love you
because they are teaching you to love
and to open your heart and eyes to little things

Make everyday count…
Appreciate every moment and take from it everything
that you possibly can,
for you may never be able to experience it again
talk to the people you never talk to before
and actually listen, like yourself falling in love
break free and set your sight high.

Tell yourself you are a great individual
and believe in yourself,
for if you don’t believe in yourself,
no one else will believe in you.

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF!

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Sorsogon News Updates, Touching Heart, Touching Lives,

DA turns over coco coir processing project

The Department of Agriculture of under its RP-Spain project recently turned over the 3.7 million coco coir processing and marketing project. This is a grant-assistance from the Spanish government through the Agencia de Cooperacion Internacional para el Desarullo (AECID).

It aims to facilitate technology adoption, resource utilization and to add value to existing economic activities of the agri-stakeholders in the rural areas. Included in the project component is the establishment and provision of processing facilities which the Castilla Development Cooperative (CADECO) in San Rafael Castilla, Sorsogon is one of the recipients.

CADECO BOD chair Ireneo D. Din said that 98% of their members are coconut and rice farmers. The cooperative has been existing for 22 years and has over eight million assets. He proudly declared that their long years of existence is due to the strong participation and cooperation of their 350 members.

The cooperative’s business activities include: palay/rice trading, rice mill and palay drying. With the establishment of the coco coir processing project, Din is optimistic that more farmers will benefit from the project as coconut husks are just left to rot in the field after copra making, but now it can be converted to cash. He was also thankful to the Local Government Unit of Castilla headed by Mayor Olive Bermillo for giving the counterpart for the installation of the 3-phase electrical installation.

OIC Regional Executive Director Marilyn V. Sta. Catalina said that the cooperative will not be successful if the members did not support the economic activities and the officers did not work hard for its success. Study shows that only few cooperatives are making good in their economic activities. She emphasized that on the part of the DA priority is given to organized cooperatives with good track record.

She challenged the cooperative to continue to serve the farmers in Castilla and the neighboring towns. She lauded the efforts of the officers for their continuous assistance and hard work to keep the cooperative afloat. She also mentioned that the cooperative maximized use of the flatbed dryer installed in the CADECO compound because record shows they were able to generate additional income of Ps 42,000 from drying palay alone.

SAIS-BC project coordinator Ernesto Parato disclosed that the region has 32 project beneficiaries. He urged the cooperative to treat the project as their business in order to generate income. He said that given the technology and the right management the project will benefit many members.

One plus factor of the project is the ready market. JUBOKEN enterprise is buying the coco coir and a marketing contract has been forged between CADECO and JUBOKEN. The project is equipped with coco coir shed, hauling truck, decorticating machine, bailing machine and electric pump. The project is jointly implemented by DA and the Philippine Coconut Authority.

There are two varieties of coir. Brown coir White coir

Brown coir is used in floor mats and doormats, brushes, mattresses, floor tiles and sacking.

The major use of white coir is in rope manufacture. Mats of woven coir fibre are made from the finer grades of bristle and white fibre using hand or mechanical looms. White coir also used to make fishing nets due to its strong resilience to salt water.       Source: Department of Agriculture April 12, 2010 (Philippines)  http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textile-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=84595

Filed under: Agriculture, Business Ideas for OFW Families, Inspiration, Invest in Sorsogon, Negosyo Tips, Sorsogon News Updates, What's Happening Here?,

Sorsogon was Heaven for me. what about you?

By: Kaye Michelle Duran Agnes

Since ive been here in Barcelona, I´ve been asked alot of times of what country i originated from. I always tell people this exact phrase. “I come from a small town that even Filipinos haven´t heard of”
SORSOGON. I´m a proud Filipina,but I´m more proud to be a Sorsogueña.

The next question would be, so what´s the language you have? and i repeat this same phrase all over again.
“I have two language. One called Bikol and one called Filipino, the official language. Bikol however has different dialects too.”

And i admit, i don´t have a broad knowledge about my own native tongue… which is a sad thing…

I think as Sorsogueños we must be well educated atleast of our language and culture. We should add this to the educational system because this is what makes us special in the first place. We have to have our own identity as a community group.

I know its hypocritical having to say all these in English. But I think in english.. and i think most Sorsogueños do too… Why? because we are losing our language. Because we weren´t taught enough of our culture. I would hate to see Sorsogon be like every place in the world…exploited and victimized by outsiders. We should act now before we lose what´s left..

I grew up having a good childhood, having to enjoy nature. To be able to play outside the wholeday without my parents ever worrying. Sorsogon was home of the good people, where you dont even have to be smart or beautiful for someone to notice you. It was heaven.

So niyan tabi, naghahagad ako saindo tabang. tabang na mapakarhay naton ang sistema sin sadiri natong lugar. lain ko aram kung papano babatugan.. ang aram ko lng kaipuhan natun magbatog sa mga batit, kay sinda ang madali na turuan at tabangan. batugan naton sa edukasyon nang sa cultura kay amo na ang padiot diot na nawawara sa aton. kadamo sin mga kilalang mayad na bicolano..nakay??sukat san batit pa lang kita, maugma na ang buhay ta. wara kita problema sin gera, o malala na sakit. ang problema lang natun ang bagyo ng tag init… so saro pa ina na dapat aksyonan naton. pero pan-o? may mga sadiring role kita na ingaganapan.. may mga tawong mayad mag surumaton pero kulang sa gibo. May mga tawo man gusto mag gibo kaso kulang sa matiryal. May mga tawo na matibay mag isip pero lain niya aram kung sino ang kakadtuan para maghagat tabang. so niyan, warang alo tabi ako nghahagad tabang sa indo na tabangan ako sa sarong proyekto na sa kita ko pwede naton padakuon. kaipuhan ko ideas nindo… kaipuhan ko tawo na mayad ang intensyon na gusto talaga magtabang.. kung interisado kamo, email me at kayemichelle03@yahoo.com. ikalat man tabi nindo ang impormasyon. do this, kung maurag man talaga kamo.

Filed under: Announcement and Suggestions, Community Service Group, Concerned Sorsoganon, Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Youth Community Service Groups, ,

Jesus L. Huenda-Damath learning math the Pinoy way

 
 

  

Jesus L. Huenda

 

Damath comes from the Pinoy checker boardgame called “dama” and mathematics. It blends local culture, education and digital technology that aim to make math teaching and learning child-friendly, challenging and interactive. In its unique way, damath boardgame ushers the Filipino school kids into the new millennium by equipping them with competitive life-long learning for understanding and ICT-fluency skills. 

 When school children play damath boardgame they also learn to explore, firm-up, deepen, and transfer to daily tasks the concepts of real numbers and its properties and operations. 

Moreover, it stimulates the children’s capability to think deeper through creative math storytelling, flowchart, concept map, tree diagram, picture riddle, haiku, cryptogram, secret code decoding, simulation, role playing, jingle or rap composing, reflection journal writing, and problem solving. 

This joyful and practical approach to contextualized teaching and learning math is the brainchild of 1981 presidential merit medal awardee teacher Jesus L. Huenda. 

As a public high school teacher in Sorsogon, Huenda always thinks of ways to optimize his talents to help others. This describes best this ordinary teacher who was cited by no less than the President of the Republic for his out-of-the-box “contribution in terms of innovative approaches in teaching and learning mathematics”. 

According to Huenda, this is how damath works: “I integrate some math concepts and numeracy skills in the indigenous boardgame of dama. In the 32 white squares (the other 32 alternately arranged squares are colored green) of the 8×8-square damath playing board, I put the symbols of mathematical operations like addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (×) and division (÷). The 12 damath chips for each player are divided into two sets (blue and red chips): those with zero, and even numbers with positive sign (+); while odd numbers have negative (-) sign. The two players try to capture chips by adapting the existing dama rules to numeracy skills which result to higher positive points, while evading those with lower negative points.” When the learners play damath, they aim to get higher point over the opponent. Capturing the opponent’s dama chips is strategically planned such that a player would target a chip representing high number. The game becomes a combination of strategic higher order thinking skills and basic mathematical operations. 

This strategy in teaching and learning math with Understanding by Design (UbD) framework has helped students look at Mathematics as a subject not so difficult to learn. 

“Unknowingly, the players are using the mathematical fundamentals when they play damath”, Mr. Huenda explained. “Those who used to dislike math is actually learning how to use math when he/she plays the boardgame and in the process learn the subject,” he added. 

Aside from “damath”, Mr. Huenda has also developed the “pierdi-gana” boardgame. He calls this boardgame “scidama”. This is the opposite of damath in the sense that the players’ main target is to have their dama chips consumed by their opponent in order to win. Scidama is focused on bringing about environmental consciousness among the school children. 

Literally, pierdi-gana means to let go by disposing water, fuel and energy consumption that contribute to global warming and climate change. The main objective of the players in scidama is to divest themselves of extravagant consumptions that can lead to environmental degradation. Here, the scidama chips represent kilowatt hours of electricity used, cubic meters of water consumed, liters of oil consumed, cooking gas used among others. 

The players strategize in such a way that they will have to reduce their consumption of these resources and in the process help in arresting global warming and climate change. “The less you consume resources, the less you contribute to the destruction of the environment. This is what we want to instill in the minds of our learners,” Huenda pointed out. 

In the scidama, the player’s main objective is to have his/her dama chips be captured by the opponent in order to win. The player who first has his/her chips decimated by the opponent wins the game. This means that the winner is able to divest himself/herself of these resources and does not use them unnecessarily. 

|“Kabaliktaran ng damath ang scidama kasi ito ay pierdi-gana o ubusan ng chips. Dapat maubos ang chips mo para manalo. In other words, I have to dispose off my expenses in water, electricity, oil and others so that I will not contribute to global warming and climate change. Kung malaki konsumo ko, I will contribute to the destruction of the environment. Gagawa ka ng plano na pagkatapos ng laro konti lang konsumo mo at ibibigay mo ang dapat mong konsumo sa kalaban mo upang hindi ka makasali sa paglubha ng kapaligiran”, Huenda added. 

Another collaborative innovation which Huenda did in cooperation with some Computer Science students is the “eDamath” which uses digital technology in playing damath against the computer itself. The damath computer game helps develop the strategic and analytical thinking skills of the students. Similarly, when two players are interconnected in their computers through the Local Area Network, they can play damath in a remote platform and the computer becomes the arbiter or scorer. 

Mr. Huenda’s electronic damath playing board can be accessed through the DepEd website (http://www.deped.gov.ph/BSE/iDEP). The eDamath appears in the computer monitor together with the damath chips that are properly labeled with positive and negative signs in even and odd numbers, respectively. 

Playing the electronic damath is also a contest on who gets the higher positive score which entails the use of the fundamental operations in math. “When students play the game, they tend to have deeper consciousness on the intricacies of the game. They get to consider every step that they make and how this can contribute to winning the game. In the process they develop analytical thinking skills,” Huenda explained. 

And there is no stopping Huenda from inventing edutainment games that teach students the basics in living such as entrepreneurship. Thus he came up with “entrepinoy damath,” a business venture game. 

Here, the fundamental operations of math and basic accounting are also used in the board game including debit and credit, simple bookkeeping, balance sheet and the like. The first set of damath chips represent rent, taxes, salaries, bonuses, discounts, cost price, and other operating expenses. The other half represents income like selling price, profit, savings, real property, building, equipment, etc. 

The game is played with the damath chips properly labeled: business expenses on one hand and business income on the other hand. The game is won by the one who has captured more chips representing incomes rather than expenses. “With this learning for understanding approach, the learners are honed on strategic business models like the efficiency of incurring less cost in order to have more income. The learners also become conscious of effectively running a business venture,” Huenda explained. 

But in business as in life, the learners still have to be trained on values and ethics. So he came up with “damath de honor”. Here the damath pieces represent positive and negative Filipino ways including interpersonal relation, consumer protection, anti-corruption and red-tape practices. 

“Ipapakain mo ang negative values at makakaipon ka ng positive values. Dapat walang greed na siyang dahilan ng corruption at illegal business transaction,” he emphasized. 

“Have you heard of damath on health and nutrition, People Power EDSA revolution, English-Filipino-Korean vocabulary-building? Or damath with three players? This is just the tip of the iceberg”, Huenda shared. 

Huenda remains a very active staff at the DepEd Central Office. Although he is a superintendent-eligible, Huenda opted to focus on educational technology innovations that will make a difference in basic education. The beneficiaries, no doubt, are the young school children who never imagined that the lowly boardgame of dama would ever play a significant role in their learning of life’s lessons. 

  

Originally posted: http://teachers-students-corner.info/2010/03/damath-learning-math-pinoy-way.html 

  

  

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, Natatanging Sorsoganon, People who inspired Us, Show your pride, Sorsogon News Updates, Sorsogon Outstanding Achievers, We will make you SHINE!, ,

Pablo D. Ayo- At 85, inventor keeps creative mind active

SORSOGON CITY, Philippines—Pablo D. Ayo Sr., who at 85 has survived two major strokes, is still inventing and designing devices that perform functions ordinary people would think impossible. One of these is a gadget that makes burnt out fluorescent bulbs light.

Ayo
, who earned his doctorate in astrophysics at Princeton University in New Jersey and is a former student of world-renowned genius-scientist Albert Einstein in 1949, still possesses the scientific creativity to invent a gadget called the EAD or electro activator device, which virtually makes an electric bulb last even with its filament broken.

Half the size of the ballast of a fluorescent bulb, the EAD increases the voltage, allowing it to jump from end to end of the broken filament and make an unbroken bulb light again.

A patent holder, Ayo has invented several gadgets, including prototypes of a rocket, voice-activated phonograph, household mini hydro generators, solar panel, tidal electric generators and photon-run car.

He was born to a poor family from the former town of Bacon, Sorsogon (now a district of Sorsogon City).

Self-supported

His parents died when he was young so he supported himself to school until he earned a scholarship to study at Princeton.

He said he had read articles on electronics and automotive when he was a teenager and learned by himself the principles and laws that govern mechanical and electronic devices.

Ayo went to Manila when he was a teenager and landed a job in an engineering company at Port Area. This allowed him to continue his college education at Arellano University where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree, major in Physics.

While studying, he remembered that he had befriended a man who shared his interest in electronics and automotive. “In tandem, we won in a competition of flying miniature airplanes that we assembled. This became our ticket to study in the United States, which brought me to Princeton University in 1945,” Ayo said.

After he finished his doctorate, Ayo came home but went back to the United States to serve as a consultant of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the central civilian agency for direction of the US space exploration program established in 1958.

By late 1960s, he was back again in Sorsogon, married Raquel Diokino, a school teacher, and established his own business called Prama Electronic Center that provided electronic services and sold electronic and scientific gadgets and equipment.

Mini hydro plant

Ayo developed the first mini hydro plant in Bacon that produced 20 kilowatts of electricity.

He developed a rocket with a remote control that traveled 20 miles per hour.

Lawrence, the second eldest among Ayo’s five children, said he was amazed at how his father created in 1972 a phonograph that played music on voice command using the jukebox mechanism.

“That was before the information technology. What fascinated me was not only how he developed that phonograph but also how it responded when you say ‘Please,’” said Lawrence, a civil and electronic engineer.

Photo-run car

Ayo also developed a prototype car that runs on photon, an elementary particle that is the quantum of the electromagnetic field and basic unit of light.

The detailed design of the photon-run car shows a battery-like gadget that traps photons triggered by solar energy and produces electric power.

Ayo said a Japanese investor got interested with his invention but the deal did not push through because the latter would only pay him if he would go to Japan.

In 1982, Ayo developed his tidal electric generator but this did not push through on the issue of sharing even as he said the project could have been profitable using clean energy source from tidal water on Kalintaan Island in Matnog.

The $5-billion project can produce one gigawatt (GW) of electricity with 10 turbines producing 100 megawatts. It surpasses the combined power production of the Bacman geothermal plant at 150 MW and the Tiwi geothermal plant at 300 MW, according to Lawrence, who works as electronic engineer at the Bacman plant.

He said 1,000 MW is equivalent to 1 GW or one billion watts of electricity.

Ayo said his project could have made the country an exporter of electric power if it was implemented and replicated in other areas.


By Juan Escandor Jr.
Philippine Daily Inquirer

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/regions/view/20100224-255167/At-85-inventor-keeps-creative-mind-active

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, Natatanging Sorsoganon, People who inspired Us, Show your pride, Sorsogon News Updates, Sorsogon Success Stories, We will make you SHINE!, , , , ,

William Dechavez – Sterling Heights TV show spotlights diversity

Sterling Heights — City officials are using a new public access television show to showcase the city’s diversity.

“What we’re looking for is educating people about who we are,” said William Dechavez, a Filipino resident who moved to the city 28 years ago and is a member of the Ethnic Community Committee, which sponsors the show. “We have several ethnic groups in Sterling Heights.”

Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte said the show fits in well with the city’s mission to embrace a diverse community.

“We are like the melting pot of the world,” he said. “The city welcomes all cultures and likes to work with everybody and try to learn from each other.”

According to the American Community Survey posted on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Web site, from 2006-08 the three-year estimated average population included 112,407 whites, 5,133 African-Americans, 539 American Indians, 8,804 Asians and 2,879 Hispanics.

“Getting to Know Your Neighbor” features interviews with immigrants who have settled in Sterling Heights.

The show also wants to feature war veterans, Holocaust survivors and others involved in historic events such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina survivors.

Show host Dennis Burin, 50, interviews residents. A Sterling Heights resident, Burin is a program curriculum coordinator for the Hazel Park Schools and a Wayne State University adjunct professor of world regional geography.

“I think this is such an important topic,” he said. “We run across people of various backgrounds in our daily lives and don’t talk.”

The first episode of the show, which aired last month, featured Iqbal Singh, chairman of the Ethnic Community Committee, who was born in India. In the second episode, Dechavez talked about how he came from the Philippines to the United States for more opportunities. He works as a special education resource room teacher for Detroit Public Schools.

“It was really relaxed and an informal conversation,” he said. He encourages other immigrants to participate.

By: Candice Williams / The Detroit News
From The Detroit News:  http://detnews.com/article/20100218/METRO03/2180399/Sterling-Heights-TV-show-spotlights-diversity

Filed under: Inspiration, Natatanging Sorsoganon, People who inspired Us, Show your pride, Sorsogon Outstanding Achievers, We will make you SHINE!,

Police Officer 3 Judith Daria-Olbes-Sorsogon police officer named to TOPWP 2009

  by Bennie A. Recebido

Sorsogon Province (1 February) — Police Officer 3 Judith Daria-Olbes, non-commissioned officer of the Sorsogon Police Provincial Office (SPPO) was named among the 8th Search of the Ten Outstanding Police Women of the Year (TOPWP) 2009.

Olbes is the first lady law enforcer in this province feted with said recognition receiving the TOPWP Kabalikat Awards trophy.

She also received cash prize from ZONTA Club of Makati Paseo de Roxas Foundation, gift certificate from the Arms Corporation Philippines (ARMSCOR) and the Outstanding Achievement Medal from the Philippine National Police (PNP).

PSSupt. Heriberto Olitoquit, police provincial director here, stated that among hundreds of nominees from the police commissioned and non-commissioned officers across the country, 28 were chosen finalists and wherefore named the deserving ten outstanding police women of the country.

“Olbes indeed deserves the recognition considering her dedication and exemplary work significantly contributing to the cause of peace and order in the local community,” related Olitoquit.

It can be recalled that Olbes was part of the successful implementation of PNP programs bridging the gap between the police and the community, including the Expanded Community Orienting Polishing System (ECOPS) that focused on the promotion of public’s health; “Kampo ng Bayan sa Lawasnon” showcasing sports development, as well as the maintenance of heightened security at the Sorsogon Baywalk.

Likewise, Olbes initiated the “Malusog na Bata, Malusog na Bansa” program targeting children in the remote barangays to be their feeding program recepients, the “Konting Tulong ni Mama at Aleng Pulis” where they chipped-in certain amount from their own pocket and used this to realize the “Kaarawang Handog ni Mama at Aleng Pulis” and the distribution of slippers, food and school supplies to children.

Olbes who is currently the SPPO’s Family Juvenile and Gender and Development PNCO is an active officer of Sorsogon Women’s Network and Development (SWND) and Visayan Forum Foundation respectively working on women and children’s welfare.

In an interview, Olbes, though didn’t expect she can really make it to the top, extends her utmost gratitude to the past provincial chiefs of SPPO including PSSupt Joel Regondola, PSSupt Henry Rañola and to PSSupt Heriberto Olitoquit, the present PD. “I am also grateful to PSupt Edgardo Ardales, Deputy Prov’l Director PSupt Elmer Ferreras and to the Non-Uniformed Personnel as well as the Police Non-Commissioned and Commissioned officers of SPPO,” she added.

Other awardees are: PSupt Lailene Amparo – Marilao Police Station, Bulacan Provincial Office (PO), Police Regional Office(PRO) 3; PCI Delia Ingalla – Taguig City PO, Southern Police District, NCRPO; PSI Lerma Tirana – Regional Police Community Relations Division, NCRPO; SPO1 Marifel Cortez – Butuan City PO, PRO 13; PO3 Zorayda Aripin – Zamboanga City PO, PRO 9; PO3 Ruth Poserio – Sta. Barbara Police Station, Pangasinan PRO, Police Regional Office 1; PO3 Lilybeth Pascual – WCPD PNCO-Camarines Sur Police Provincial Office (PPO), PRO 5; PO2 Famela Suba – Cabiao Police Station, Nueva Ecija PPO, PRO 3; PO2 Rina Salaya – Maasin Municipal Police Station, Iloilo PPO, PRO 6.

President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo herself conferred the award to the Ten Outstanding Police Women of the Philippines, Jan. 13, at Rizal Hall in Malacañang.

These awardees that make up this year’s TOPWP were chosen for the honor by the ZONTA Club of Makati Paseo de Roxas Foundation and the Philippine National Police. (PIA Sorsogon) [top]

Filed under: Inspiration, Sorsoganon in the LIMELIGHT!, Sorsogon Outstanding Achievers, Touching Heart, Touching Lives, We will make you SHINE!, , ,

Life Still Has a Meaning

If there is a future there is time for mending-
Time to see your troubles coming to an ending.

Life is never hopeless however great your sorrow-
If you’re looking forward to a new tomorrow.

If there is time for wishing then there is time for hoping-
When through doubt and darkness you are blindly groping.

Though the heart be heavy and hurt you may be feeling-
If there is time for praying there is time for healing
.

So if through your window there is a new day breaking-
Thank God for the promise, though mind and soul be aching,

If with harvest over there is grain enough for gleaning-
There is a new tomorrow and life still has meaning.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration,

Prieto Diaz, Sorsogon-Kapusong Totoo School supplies given to poor students

GMA truly touching peoples lives! Kapusong Totoo donated school supplies to poor student here.  As such, We wanted to let you know how much we appreciate all the efforts GMA put into the realization of this project. Once again, thank you very much for your generous support and Merry X-MAS & Happy New year to all the staff of Kapusong Totoo..MABUHAY PO KAYONG LAHAT!! Dios mabalos!!

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Get Involved, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, Public Service, Touching Heart, Touching Lives, Youth Community Service Groups

GMA to DepEd: Replicate ‘kariton’ classroom

MANILA, Philippines – President Arroyo directed yesterday presidential adviser on education Mona Valisno to replicate the kariton classroom system in areas not reached by the Department of Education.

Following the worldwide recognition that CNN Hero of the Year Efren Peñaflorida’s kariton (pushcart) classroom has generated, the government is now adopting the strategy to reach out to school children, especially in remote areas in the country.

Yesterday, Peñaflorida was conferred the prestigious Order of Lakandula with the rank of komandante at Malacañang for the honor he and his Dynamic Teen Co. (DTC) brought to the country on a worldwide stage. His parents, Lucila and Efren Sr., accompanied him to Malacañang.

The President told Valisno to work with non-government organizations such as the DTC and support them in education programs for children.

She said the focus should be on children from poor families who most likely would have lesser access to education.

“If Kenya was able to have success replicating the program, then there should be no reason for the Philippines not to do this too,” she said.   – Marvin Sy

 

(The Philippine Star) Updated November 28, 2009 12:00 AM

Filed under: Education, Encouragement, Inspiration, People who inspired Us, ,

Succeed with a Positive Attitude

Friends, please take a moment to watch this short video clip about ” Succeed with a positive attitude”. Dios mabalos!

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration,

LIFE IS LIKE A CUP OF COFFEE

Guys, here’s another inspirational video that I want to share with you. Hope this will inspire you too and please share it with the people you care about!

This video combines beautiful pictures, inspiring music, and a touching story to help empower people to live more fully.

Filed under: Encouragement, Inspiration, , ,

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